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Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! Please note, this event has passed. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

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CONFERENCE SCHEDULE UPDATES & CHANGES: As a result of the prolonged government shutdown, we experienced a number of cancellations and changes to the schedule. Cancellations and changes are listed here (as of January 26, 2019). 

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Poster [clear filter]
Tuesday, January 29
 

6:00pm EST

(CANCELLED) (P83) Routine Respiration Rates of Larval and Juvenile Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)
AUTHORS. Taaja R. Tucker, University of Toledo; Kevin Keeler, Five Rivers Services LLC; Edward Roseman, U.S. Geological Survey; Dylan Jones, U.S. Geological Survey; Scott Jackson, University of Toledo; Stacey Ireland, US Geological Survey

ABSTRACT. The lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), a state-listed threatened species in Michigan, is a focal species targeted for recovery in the St. Clair-Detroit River System (SCDRS). Since the early 2000s, spawning habitat restoration projects have been completed in seven locations throughout the SCDRS to increase recruitment of lake sturgeon in the system.  Little is known about the feeding habits and the energy requirements of early-life stage lake sturgeon in the SCDRS. Bioenergetics models allow for the creation of energy budgets for individual fish and can extrapolated to fish populations. While bioenergetics models exist for several species and life stages of sturgeon, one has not yet been developed for young lake sturgeon. Measurement of respiration rates is integral to the generation of bioenergetics models. To determine oxygen consumption rates, fertilized lake sturgeon eggs were collected from the St. Clair River, Michigan and reared in the laboratory at the USGS Great Lakes Science Center under a temperature regime closely matching that of the river (13-21°C). Oxygen uptake by larval and juvenile lake sturgeon (1-10 individuals per trial) was measured in a closed, 38mL respirometer (PreSens Fibox 3 fiber optic oxygen meter with OxyView software). Trials were performed in thirty-minute intervals weekly as early as 1-day post-hatch. Routine respiration rates were calculated and compared between sizes (e.g., yolk sac larvae vs. post-yolk sac larvae vs. juvenile) and between those generated for Fish Bioenergetics 4.0 (pallid sturgeon, Scaphirhynchus albus). Further needs for the development of a bioenergetics model for lake sturgeon are discussed.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D

6:00pm EST

(P80) Summary of a Long Term Study Leading to Population Augmentation for the Endangered Blanding’s Turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) in an Urbanized Landscape
AUTHORS. Crystal Robertson, Paul Yannuzzi, Shannon Ritchie, Andrew Lentini, Bob Johnson – Toronto Zoo’s Adopt-A-Pond Programme

ABSTRACT. It is widely accepted that urbanization negatively impacts freshwater turtle populations. The challenge to sustain viable Species at Risk turtle populations in the changing urban habitat of Toronto has been a focus of study for the Toronto Zoo since 1999.  Snapping Turtle, Northern Map Turtle and Blanding’s Turtle were radio tracked within the Rouge Park to understand population size, home range, and habitat use in an urbanized riverine and wetland system supplemented with manmade and restored habitat features. Characterization of microhabitat, macrohabitat and nesting habitat, both natural and manmade, was also undertaken. A population viability analysis (PVA) was run in 2012 to determine the sustainability of Blanding’s Turtle in the area. Given that only 7 Blanding’s Turtles were observed over 13 years, the PVA verified that the population is functionally extinct. Supplementation of Blanding’s Turtle was recommended to recover this population and began in 2014. It is expected to continue until 2040. Ongoing research into available habitat and survivorship of supplemental hatchlings and juveniles continues to lead to a greater understanding of population augmentation strategies. Continued study of the turtles in this urban habitat will inform recovery planning for restoring and managing turtles in the urbanized landscape.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D

6:00pm EST

(P81) Paddlefish Movement and Habitat Use Using Acoustic Telemetry in the Upper Mississippi River (Pools 14-19)
AUTHORS. Dominique Turney, Western Illinois University; James Lamer, Western Illinois University; Kevin Irons, Illinois Department of Natural Resources; Kyle Mosel, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

ABSTRACT. The construction of dams on the Upper Mississippi River has disrupted movement of the highly migratory paddlefish. Even though important work using radio-telemetry has provided information on paddlefish dam passage and lateral habitat use, these studies are often limited spatially and were undertaken prior to the establishment of the extensive acoustic receiver array upstream and downstream of each dam on the Mississippi River. Lock and Dam 14 and 15 are infrequently at open river conditions and most fish passage occurs in the lock chamber. To better understand native fish passage in this poorly understood region, we acoustically tagged 121 paddlefish and tracked their movements manually and with stationary receivers upstream and at the approach to each dam. Upstream and downstream passage over Lock and Dam 14 and 15 has been observed by paddlefish. A clear understanding of paddlefish movement and habitat use in the UMR will allow researchers and biologists to better understand dam passage of other fishes and evaluate the impacts of potential invasive species deterrents at these locations.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D

6:00pm EST

(P82) Recovery of Bigeye Chub (Hybopsis amblops) Populations in Illinois
AUTHORS. Josh Sherwood, Andrew Stites, Jeremy Tiemann, Michael Dreslik – Illinois Natural History Survey

ABSTRACT. Populations of Bigeye Chub (Hybopsis amblops) in Illinois showed drastic declines during the middle of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century. Population declines were so drastic that it was thought to be extirpated from the state in the late 1970’s and 1980’s. Since 2000, Bigeye Chub populations have shown a steady increase in distribution and abundance in east-central Illinois.  Individuals are now commonly collected in four of the seven drainage basins where they once occurred in the state. We analyzed population dynamics and diet preferences of recovered populations in Illinois in order to fill knowledge gaps needed to successfully manage this species. These data, along with models of historical distribution within Illinois, provide the guidance needed to fully recover state Bigeye Chub populations. 

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D