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Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! Please note, this event has passed. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

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CONFERENCE SCHEDULE UPDATES & CHANGES: As a result of the prolonged government shutdown, we experienced a number of cancellations and changes to the schedule. Cancellations and changes are listed here (as of January 26, 2019). 

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Poster [clear filter]
Tuesday, January 29
 

6:00pm EST

(P73) Habitat Selection of Michigan Bog Grasshoppers in Huron National Forest
AUTHORS. Brittany A. Shelton-Dooley, Madison T. Nadler – Wittenberg University; Jasmine A. Jones, Kimberly A. Piccolo – U.S. Forest Service; Richard S. Phillips, Wittenberg University

ABSTRACT. The Michigan Bog Grasshopper (Appalachia arcana) is designated as a Regional Forest Service Sensitive Species endemic to the state of Michigan. In 2017, timber was harvested in an area of the Mio Ranger District in Huron National Forest with a documented Michigan Bog Grasshopper population, though the impact of management on this species is currently unknown. In 2018, the grasshopper population on the 54-acre plot was studied to determine the impact of management on habitat use and population dynamics of this species. One vegetation plot was conducted per acre (n=54) using a 1 m<sup>2</sup>quadrat to identify available habitat. Measurements collected include height class, horizontal density, and proximal tree species distance from the center of each plot. In the 54 acre survey area, visual encounter surveys were conducted by slowly walking and placing a flag where a grasshopper was observed. After confirming the species and sex of the grasshopper, coordinates were recorded and a vegetation survey was conducted to identify selected habitat (n=103, 67 males and 36 females). This replicated a 2014 study on the same site in which 51 males and 33 females were counted. Although no estimate was produced, comparison with the 2014 data suggests the population has not experienced a decline and the area of usable habitat may have expanded. Michigan Bog Grasshoppers continue to select areas containing sweet fern and dense blueberry understory along with course woody debris. <a name="_Hlk524978184"></a> Composition of vegetation plots yielded strong selection ratios for sweet fern (?<sub>female</sub>=2.18, ?<sub>male</sub>=2.60), course woody debris (?<sub>female</sub>=2.75, ?<sub>male</sub>=2.40), and blueberry (?<sub>female</sub>=1.83, ?<sub>fmale</sub>=2.1).  Although more study is needed, the results suggest timber harvest may not negatively influence Michigan Bog Grasshopper population numbers or alter habitat selection. 

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Invertebrate

6:00pm EST

(P74) Volunteer Stream Quality Monitoring: Fostering Community Engagement in Ohio’s Scenic Rivers
AUTHORS. Robert Gable, Matthew Smith, Christina Kuchle – Ohio Scenic Rivers Program

ABSTRACT. For over 50 years, the Ohio Scenic Rivers Program has had great success partnering with local communities, landowners, government agencies, conservation organizations, businesses and individuals in the protection of fourteen of the state’s outstanding river ecosystems.  Conservation goals have been achieved through public outreach and education, implementation of innovative conservation measures, enhancing recreational opportunities, and emphasis on the protection of sensitive areas critical to high-quality stream ecosystems.  One of the most important tools to the success of the Scenic Rivers Program has been education and outreach through the Volunteer Stream Quality Monitoring (SQM) Project.  SQM focuses on the basic study of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in Ohio’s fourteen designated state wild, scenic and recreational rivers to evaluate overall stream health.  Introducing individuals to their first crayfish, mayfly or leech sparks an interest in the stream ecosystem.  Participants become empowered with information and understanding; qualities that drive advocacy and conservation action.  Since the inception of the Volunteer SQM Project in 1983, more than 150,000 individuals and groups have monitored over 150 locations in Ohio’s wild, scenic and recreational rivers.  In 2017 alone, the Scenic Rivers Program had over 7,600 individuals participate state wide creating an integral component to the overall success of the Ohio Scenic Rivers Program.  Sharing the methods behind our success may be valuable to other conservation organizations looking to grow voices for their waterways and support for conservation of high-quality river and stream resources.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Invertebrate

6:00pm EST

(P75) Functional Diversity of Macroinvertebrates in Coastal Wetlands Along the St. Marys River
AUTHORS. Zachary Johnson, Ashley Moerke, Mary Markel – Lake Superior State University

ABSTRACT. Great Lakes coastal wetlands are an important ecosystem that is often being altered by human activity. One way to measure the effect disturbances may have on wetlands is by examining functional diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Over a 7-year period (2011-2017), macroinvertebrate assemblages across 26 wetland sites in the St. Marys River were assessed to determine if macroinvertebrates in wetlands exposed to high wave action exhibited different traits than protected wetlands. Of these 26 sites, 13 were in close proximity and exposed to a dredged freighter shipping channel (exposed sites), and 13 were located away from the channel or otherwise protected by a barrier or embayment (protected sites). We hypothesized that exposed sites would be dominated by macroinvertebrates with disturbance-associated traits whereas barrier sites would possess a composition reflecting more stable environmental conditions. Macroinvertebrates were collected from four vegetation zones, identified following Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands Monitoring Program protocols, and assigned traits (functional mode of existence and voltinism) using the USEPA’s Freshwater Biological Traits Database. Trait composition of macroinvertebrate assemblages in exposed and protected sites varied by vegetation type, with Schoenoplectus zones possessing higher wave action, and Typha and Phragmites zones generally receiving less wave action. In nearly all vegetation zones, mutlivoltinism and disturbance-resistant functional mode of existence was higher in protected than exposed sites, which was counter to our expectations and inconsistent with current ecological theory concerning macroinvertebrate assemblage response to wave action-induced disturbances. Further analyses are needed to understand the drivers of invertebrate trait composition in St Marys River wetlands.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Invertebrate