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Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! Please note, this event has passed. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

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CONFERENCE SCHEDULE UPDATES & CHANGES: As a result of the prolonged government shutdown, we experienced a number of cancellations and changes to the schedule. Cancellations and changes are listed here (as of January 26, 2019). 

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Poster [clear filter]
Tuesday, January 29
 

6:00pm EST

(P35) Ecology of Box-nesting Waterfowl in Central WI: Biological versus Societal Benefits
AUTHORS. Elianne Heilhecker, Marissa Kaminski, Dr. Jacob Straub, Dr. Matt Palumbo, Leah Bell, Sean Mason – University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

ABSTRACT. Cavity nesting birds like Aix sponsa (Wood ducks) and Lophodytes cucullatus (Hooded merganser) relied historically on natural tree cavities but today some populations have the option to use nest boxes for their eggs. At the Mead Wildlife Area in central Wisconsin, cavity nesting waterfowl have the option to use tree cavities or nest boxes. Currently, most data suggests sufficient natural tree cavities are available for cavity nesting birds, yet duck boxes still remain a factor at many wildlife management areas. While nest box use by these species has varied over time, recently managers have inquired which, if any, factors predict if a nest box will be successful.  Managers should also consider the potential societal benefits (e.g., public engagement, educational opportunities, etc.) box programs could have.  Beginning in 2002 data has been collected by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Wildlife Society by checking 78-129 boxes annually in January and February. Other studies in our study site have demonstrated low box use rates (<15%) by waterfowl. Our aim is to evaluate biological (i.e., nest success, use, etc.) and societal value of a box-program in Central Wisconsin and make management recommendations accordingly. Our biological evaluation will assist field biologists by evaluating if five independent predictor variables have any significant effect on our response variables. To determine this, competing model sets will be evaluated with a single or combinations of the following variables: species, year, use from previous year, location, and age of box.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Ecology

6:00pm EST

(P36) Evaluating the Fish Communities of Riffles/runs with Three Different Substrate Types in Preparation for Changes Post Lowhead Dam Removal
AUTHORS. Drew Holloway, Muncie Sanitary District Bureau of Water Quality; Kaleb Eden, Ball State University

ABSTRACT. The importance of a natural flow regime has been well documented throughout the years. The traditional riffle, run, pool sequence allows a stream to optimize its community structure and allow habitat specific species an opportunity to flourish. Lowhead dams alter this process and overtime can lead to expansive impoundments reducing the amount of riffle and run habitats available. The removal of neglected and unnecessary dams will allow a stream to return to its natural state. The West Fork of White River in Muncie, In will be having two of its lowhead dams removed in the coming year allowing these habitats to return. In preparation for these removals and the anticipated substrate changes, a 10x10m sandy run, boulder/cobble riffle and bedrock riffle were sampled using electrofishing methods. A total of 19 species were sampled for a total of 422 individuals. Five of the species were observed in all three substrate types including four Cyprinidae species. When looking at each substrate type individually we see subtle differences, like the presence of various Percidae species that were absent in the sandy run but dominant in the boulder/cobble riffle. The results of this project will be used to help explain the potential changes seen as the West Fork White River returns to its natural state.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Ecology

6:00pm EST

(P37) Assessing the Impact of Mussel Bed Presence on Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Communities and Stream Function
AUTHORS. Justin Radecki, Kathryn Sheets, Ana Wassilak, Raelee Olson – Grand Valley State University

ABSTRACT. This project examined the relationship between live, active mussel beds and macroinvertebrate communities in two Barry CO., MI stream systems. Surveys of the Coldwater River & Cedar Creek were conducted to search for live mussel beds and identify species presence and abundance, and to complete quantitative sampling of the macroinvertebrate community within these same mussel beds and at paired sites without mussels.  Abiotic factors including water chemistry, substrate analysis, width, depth, velocity, and canopy cover were also sampled at all sites. We hypothesized that mussel beds would contain a larger percent of filter-feeding macroinvertebrates. The results of this project should be useful to track recovery in the degraded Coldwater River, and establish a framework for baseline conditions in Cedar Creek. Our preliminary data indicates that there was a significantly greater abundance of dipterans in Cedar Creek in comparison to the Coldwater River (% abundance 49 vs. 31; p=0.032; ANOVA).  Similarly, total macroinvertebrate abundance was significantly higher in Cedar Creek vs. the Coldwater River (total abundance 10,500 vs. 4,100; p=0.052; ANOVA). According to completed analyses, there was no significant difference in %EPT, richness, Family Biotic Index, or diversity between the two systems. Additionally, a wider range of mussel species (9 species in Cedar Creek to 6 species in the Coldwater River) and a higher abundance of mussels overall were found at the Cedar Creek sites than in the Coldwater River. Our preliminary results concerning relationship between macroinvertebrates and mussel beds suggest little difference in macroinvertebrate communities between experimental and control sites.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Ecology