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CONFERENCE SCHEDULE UPDATES & CHANGES: As a result of the prolonged government shutdown, we experienced a number of cancellations and changes to the schedule. Cancellations and changes are listed here (as of January 26, 2019). 

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Other - Asian Carp [clear filter]
Tuesday, January 29
 

4:20pm EST

(CANCELLED) (FISHERIES: INVASIVE SPECIES 2) Demographics of Bigheaded Carp in the Illinois River, IL
AUTHORS: Jeremy Hammen*, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Columbia Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office; Jahn Kallis, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Columbia Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office; Emily Pherigo, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Columbia Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office; Jason Goeckler, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Columbia Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office

ABSTRACT: Effective fisheries management requires representative data that can be collected in an efficient, reasonable timeframe. This can be difficult for invasive species, like Bigheaded carp, where conventional methods can be limited in their ability to assess populations. Recent gear development and evaluation efforts have provided crucial information on the advancements in sampling methods and tools for Bigheaded carp. Information gained from these studies could be used to give managers and researchers the ability to appropriately assess these Bigheaded carp populations over a temporal and spatial scale. A pool-wide Bigheaded carp monitoring design using one of these novel gears, the electrified dozer trawl, was developed to evaluate the population characteristic differences throughout the Illinois River. Preliminary (first year) results demonstrated that population demographics at the pool level differed throughout the Illinois River. Relative abundance and size structure change throughout the Illinois River and small fish (< 200mm) were absent from the upper two pools. Additionally, it appears that habitats (main channel border, side channel, backwater) may differ in Bigheaded carp demographics but results after the first year were not significant likely due to small sample size. Estimated sample sizes based on minimizing variation in relative abundance and size structure appear to be representative through one year. Early results suggests that management of Bigheaded carp in the Illinois River may be different from pool to pool. Additionally, further refinement of the sampling efforts may be possible (i.e., smaller sample size) to make monitoring these populations more efficient and effective. Maintaining successful management activities for Bigheaded carp will require cost-effective sampling efforts in a representative and effective matter. This work will benefit those management efforts in the Illinois River and this study could provide the framework to expand throughout their Mississippi River basin where Bigheaded carp are located.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 4:20pm - 4:40pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM C
 


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  • Main Agenda Item
  • PLENARY SESSION
  • Poster
  • S01: Using Standardized Assessments to Evaluate Harvest Regulations: Advancing Science-Based Fisheries Management
  • S02: Eastern Massasauga Conservation - Management - Recovery
  • S03: Application of environmental DNA-based tools for aquatic invasive species monitoring and management
  • S04: Great Lakes Trophic Structure: Innovations and ongoing studies of predatory fishes
  • S05: Migratory wildlife collisions with manmade structures: monitoring - prevention - patterns from collision data
  • S06: Considering New Paradigms in the Management of Beaver - Trout - Riparian Habitats
  • S07: Use of Acoustic Telemetry to Inform Fisheries Management Across Midwestern US and Canada
  • S08: Science in service to wetlands conservation and wildlife management in the lower Great Lakes region: history - status - state of the art
  • S09: Carbon Dioxide As An Aquatic Resource Management Tool
  • S10: The Ohio Biodiversity Conservation Partnership: An Innovative University-State Agency Partnership for Conservation in Ohio
  • S11: Dreissenid Mussels: Advancements in control - detection - management - biology
  • S12: Reading the aquatic landscape and connecting restoration design
  • S13: Sea Grant role in communicating needs to inform research and conservation
  • S14: Bridging the Gap between Fish and Wildlife: Discussions on Multi-Species Interactions and Ecosystem Stability
  • S15: Collaborating with community members: the human side of fish and wildlife management and research
  • S16: Agriculture and Wildlife Coexistence in the Midwest United States
  • Student Event
  • T01: Fisheries: Great Lakes I
  • T02: Wildlife: Urban-Wildlife Conflict
  • T03: Fisheries: Behavior & Physiology
  • T04: Wildlife: Wetland Conservation
  • T05: Lightning Talk Session: Fisheries
  • T06: Human Dimensions: Fisheries I
  • T07: Fisheries: Rivers & Streams
  • T08: Wildlife: Waterfowl
  • T09: Human Dimensions: Wildlife
  • T10: Fisheries: Invasive Species I
  • T11: Fisheries: Fish Conservation
  • T12: Wildlife: Cervids
  • T13: Fisheries: Habitat
  • T14: Fisheries: Great Lakes II
  • T15: Fisheries: Lakes & Reservoirs
  • T16: Fisheries: Invertebrates
  • T17: Wildlife: Mammals
  • T18: Human Dimensions: Policy & Engagement
  • T19: Fisheries: Early Life History
  • T20: Wildlife: Upland I
  • T21: Fisheries: Invasive Species II
  • T22: Wildlife: Turtles
  • T23: Fisheries: Big Rivers
  • T24: Wildlife: Upland II
  • T25: Fisheries: Techniques
  • T26: Fisheries: Invasive Species III
  • T27: Wildlife: Avian
  • T28: Lightning Talk Session: Wildlife
  • T29: Human Dimensions: Fisheries II
  • Workshop