Loading…
Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! Please note, this event has passed. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

For tips on navigating this schedule, click HELPFUL INFO below.

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE UPDATES & CHANGES: As a result of the prolonged government shutdown, we experienced a number of cancellations and changes to the schedule. Cancellations and changes are listed here (as of January 26, 2019). 

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Fisheries Techniques [clear filter]
Monday, January 28
 

10:20am EST

(SYMPOSIA-01) The North American AFS Freshwater Fish Sampling Standardization Program: Update and Evaluating Harvest Regulations
AUTHORS: Scott A. Bonar, U.S. Geological Survey Arizona Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit; Norman Mercado-Silva, Centro de Investigacion en Biodiversidad y Conservacion, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos; Kevin L. Pope, U.S. Geological Survey Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

ABSTRACT: Evaluation of harvest regulations clearly benefits from standard collection and presentation of data. Advantages include the ability to better evaluate regulations over space and time; the ability to share data more effectively with colleagues across political boundaries; the capacity to design large studies; and improved communication with anglers. The American Fisheries Society developed standard methods to sample freshwater fish populations to aid in data comparison and collection, publishing them in 2009 in the book Standard Methods for Sampling North American Freshwater Fishes. This project involved 284 scientists from 107 different organizations across Canada, Mexico and the United States. Because of interest generated from the first edition, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA) and AFS are supporting development of a second edition of the book to move AFS closer towards having development of standard sampling methods as an ongoing activity of the society. Goals for the second edition include querying fish management agencies across North America as to areas of improvement, but otherwise retaining methods as similar as possible to preserve standardization; adding additional requested chapters and expanding participants; revising data averages and developing a process for updating methods in the future. Standardization in industry, medicine and science has led to great advances. American Fisheries Society standard freshwater fish sampling methods are a powerful tool for addressing a wide variety of changing objectives. One of these is evaluating harvest management regulations, where improved assessments are possible with larger samples sizes, the ability to design before-after-treatment-control experiments and collaborate across political boundaries when managing the continent's fish populations.

Monday January 28, 2019 10:20am - 10:40am EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

11:00am EST

(SYMPOSIA-01) Using “Standard” vs. “Standardized” Sampling Methods to Evaluate Sport Fish Regulations
AUTHORS: Jeremy J. Pritt, Joseph D. Conroy – Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife

ABSTRACT: In 2009, the American Fisheries Society (AFS) published a recommended set of Standard Methods, which sought to provide comparable fisheries data across North America. Since then, many agencies and researchers have adopted these standard methods. However, to evaluate regulations agencies often use long-term data produced by “standardized” methods—consistently used, long-term approaches that may have been shared among multiple agencies but that also differ from the North American Standard Methods (NASM). Significant barriers may exist for fisheries managers and researchers who consider transitioning from “standardized” methods to the NASM. Here, we illustrate important differences between “standard” and “standardized” methods in the context of evaluating sport fish regulations. To make informed decisions regarding regulation effectiveness, fisheries managers require population-specific data such as abundance, age and size structures, growth, and mortality measured before the regulation was implemented and for some period after. In some cases, the NASM may fail to provide these crucial data. To illustrate, we contrast two case studies: (1) using the NASM to evaluate reservoir crappie harvest regulations; as compared to, (2) retaining a multi-agency, non-NASM, but “standardized” method to assess the efficacy of Ohio River Sauger regulations. We conclude by recommending the following for future standard method development work: (1) explicitly consider and detail the sport fish population data needs of fisheries managers; (2) develop a mechanism to formally capture emerging assessment techniques as standard methods; and, (3) create a structure, through AFS, tasked with identifying, evaluating, and communicating accepted standard methods and their use.

Monday January 28, 2019 11:00am - 11:20am EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

11:20am EST

(HUMAN DIMENSIONS: FISHERIES 1) Framing Social Values: How Small Fisheries Can Improve Quality of Life in South Dakota
AUTHORS: Aaron Sundmark (Ph.D. Student), Larry Gigliotti (Professor) – South Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: Sportfishing management focuses on fish resources, as well as the people using these resources. Therefore, evaluating management performance requires assessing both environmental and human-centered outcomes of a fishery. Over 400 small lakes in South Dakota are managed by the state agency to provide convenient opportunities to anglers and other recreational user groups. In January of 2017, a total of 3,753 questionnaires were mailed to residents near 7 small lakes that were diverse spatially and in their proximities to larger urban centers across South Dakota. We received completed surveys from 1,318 respondents (40% response rate). We measured the value of the lake to residents’ quality of life (dependent variable), familiarity with the lake, activities done at the lake, evaluations of conditions and amenities at the lakes and demographic variables. Analyses determined the uses, attitudes and values towards small lakes that are best at predicting their importance to local citizens’ overall quality of life living in nearby communities. Our findings suggest that the inclusion of social values in efforts to evaluate an agency’s management performance could help managers understand and predict the various user groups and the amount of overall use a lake resource will receive over time.

Monday January 28, 2019 11:20am - 11:40am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM B

11:30am EST

(FISHERIES: LIGHTNING TALK) Fish Assemblages in an Effluent Dominated Stream in Central Illinois
AUTHORS: Ryan W. Sparks, Cassi J. Moody-Carpenter, Scott Meiners, Robert E. Colombo – Eastern Illinois University

ABSTRACT: The Sangamon River, a tributary to the Illinois River, stretches about 396 kilometers across Central Illinois. The river basin has a dam located in the city of Decatur, IL creating a lake to supply drinking water for the city. Roughly 5 miles downstream of Lake Decatur, the Sanitary District of Decatur releases treated wastewater into the Sangamon River. Furthermore, 2 combined sewer outflows are located above the effluent, they are not treated. Fish were sampled at sites above this point pollution, directly at the source, and several miles below using DC-pulse electrofishing for 3 years. Also, we collected water quality data from 1 site upstream and 5 sites downstream of the Sanitary District. Our results showed high numbers of forage fish, consisting of almost 35 percent of the family Clupeidae and 18 percent Cyprinidae. The next highest abundance was Catostomidae at 30 percent; which displayed a high proportion of abnormal fin morphology. All abnormal fish were found below the point pollution of the wastewater treatment plant. Using Pulse-DC electrofishing, we will continue sampling our sites as well as incorporating mark-recapture methods in different seasons to track movement of fish in relation to the effluent.

Monday January 28, 2019 11:30am - 11:40am EST
VETERANS MEETING ROOM A/B

2:00pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-01) Using Standardized Assessments to Evaluate Harvest Regulations in Illinois: Let's Start the Discussion
AUTHORS: Michael J. Mounce, Division of Fisheries, Illinois Department of Natural Resources

ABSTRACT: The Division of Fisheries in the Illinois Department of Natural Resources lists specific protocol in our Manual of Operations for standardized sampling methods for the evaluation of both fish populations and the success of stocked fish. We do not have standardized methods specified for evaluating harvest regulations. Our biologists realize that this would be a valuable tool. The Division of Fisheries does have a standard form for submitting harvest regulations requests/suggestions for review by piers, mid-level managers, and finally approval by the Chief of Fisheries. This form does not include any request or requirements for evaluating the suggested regulation. The AFS book, "Standard Methods for Sampling North American Freshwater Fishes" suggested sampling methods for specific species would be a great foundation if these methods can be employed prior to implementing the harvest regulation. Effectively and adequately collecting data about the "three" rate functions, recruitment, growth, and mortality, is critical. The estimation of angler mortality is a critical component of any harvest regulation proposal. Angler harvest/creel surveys should be the foundation of any harvest regulation proposal and evaluation, as the success of any regulation will only be realized where angling mortality is a/the critical factor in limiting the quality or viability of a fishery. Many state agencies, including the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, are facing staffing and funding shortages for a wide variety of reasons and this affects their ability to critically evaluate the effectiveness of harvest regulations, or propose and implement new sampling protocol. However, the development of methods and tools (supporting software) to appropriately propose and evaluate harvest regulations would be highly valuable asset to fisheries managers, the resources they manage, the agencies and constituents they work for, and ultimately the communities that benefit economically from fisheries with greater stability and improved quality.

Monday January 28, 2019 2:00pm - 2:20pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

2:00pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-03) Determine What Fishes Adult Sea Lamprey Parasitized by Barcoding DNA in Their Feces
AUTHORS: Nicholas Johnson, U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center; Chris Merkes, Joel Putnam – U.S. Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

ABSTRACT: Sea lamprey are controlled in the Great Lakes to reduce damage to valuable fisheries. Sea lamprey control is effective, but damage caused by remaining sea lamprey is poorly defined because because sea lamprey feed on blood and traditional gut content analysis has not possible.  Here, we test the concept that sea lamprey diet can be quantified by barcoding DNA in sea lamprey feces.  Specifically, we determined the percentage of fecal samples containing measureable DNA from host fishes when collected from (1) recently fed parasitic sea lamprey, (2) fasted parasitic sea lamprey transitioning to the adult stage, and (3) adult sea lamprey captured from a spawning stream.   If successful, the method could help managers better interpret lake trout wounding rates by providing insight as to how often hosts alternative to lake trout are targeted by sea lamprey. Ultimately, our vision is that adult sea lamprey assessment in each Great Lake may be able to produce an annual estimate of abundance and an estimate what fishes that cohort of adult sea lamprey were feeding on, so that fish managers could estimate damage caused to specific fish stocks.

Monday January 28, 2019 2:00pm - 2:20pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

2:20pm EST

(CANCELLED) (SYMPOSIA-03) DNA-based Dietary Analysis of Invasive Flathead Catfish: A Case Study from the Edisto River, South Carolina
AUTHORS: Aaron P. Maloy, Stephanie Dowell, Roman Crumpton, James Henne, Julie C. Schroeter, Christopher B. Rees, Meredith L. Bartron – U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

ABSTRACT: Flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) are large, primarily piscivorous, predators native to Gulf Coast drainages of the Mobile, Mississippi and Rio Grande River.  Intentional stockings outside of their native range were common in the early to mid-20<sup>th</sup> century, many of which resulted in self-recruiting populations that have become invasive.  Flathead catfish alter native species communities through direct predation and are considered one of the most biologically harmful invasive fish. Obtaining detailed trophic data through traditional dietary analysis is difficult due to the lack of morphological characteristics of prey and because fish are commonly taken with empty stomachs. To address these challenges a study was undertaken on the Edisto River, South Carolina to assess the trophic ecology of invasive flathead catfish using DNA-based dietary methods. A combination of DNA barcoding and metabarcoding revealed a varied diet of crustaceans, bivalves, eggs and numerous fish species.  Traditional COI barcoding was useful for determining the identity of larger remnants of prey items of both fish and invertebrates.  Metabarcoding of the 12S rRNA gene targeted fish species and was successful at identifying prey even when morphological examination determined stomachs to be empty.  A higher rate of prey detection was observed in material collected from the stomachs than that obtained from the intestines.  Used in conjunction, the two methods provided a more complete understanding of flathead catfish predation than any one method in isolation.

Monday January 28, 2019 2:20pm - 2:40pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

2:40pm EST

(FISHERIES: RIVERS & STREAMS) The Temporal Effects of Heavy Metal Contamination on the Fish Community of the West Fork White River, Muncie, IN
AUTHORS: Drew Holloway, Muncie Sanitary District Bureau of Water Quality; Jason Doll, University of Mt. Olive; Robert Shields, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

ABSTRACT: The importance of monitoring anthropogenic changes in a lotic system are not limited to chemical water quality monitoring. The addition of biological monitoring allows fish to be used as bioindicators because of their varying tolerance to pollution. For this study we utilized long-term water quality and fish data to evaluate temporal changes brought on by passage of the Clean Water Act (1972). Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMS) was used to describe changes in the fish community and also heavy metal concentrations of the West Fork White River inMuncie, Indiana over the past 33 years. The NMS results for both heavy metals and fish separated into distinct decadal clusters. The shift in fish community data was characterized by a drop in pollution tolerant species and an increase in intolerant species. A decrease in heavy metal concentrations (chromium, zinc, and lead) was also found during this time period. All NMS fish axis had a positive slope indicating an increase in intolerant species as heavy metal concentrations decreased. Our findings indicate that the water quality improvements documented in the West Fork White River have directly impacted its local fish community. 

Monday January 28, 2019 2:40pm - 3:00pm EST
CENTER STREET ROOM C

3:20pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-01) Criteria for Removing a Protected Slot Limit on Smallmouth Bass Using Standardized Fisheries Survey Data
AUTHORS: Mark J. Fincel, South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks

ABSTRACT: In an effort to improve size structure of Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu in Lake Sharpe, a large Missouri River impoundment, the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks instituted two protected slot limits: restricted (305-457 mm) beginning in 2003 and relaxed (355-457 mm) beginning in 2008. We examined the effects of these regulations on Smallmouth Bass harvest and population characteristics and compared creel and population trends of Lake Sharpe Smallmouth Bass to adjacent reservoirs where Smallmouth Bass harvest was not regulated. Prior to the slot limit, the majority of the Smallmouth Bass harvest on Lake Sharpe was from 250-400 mm (PP355 mm, and angler catch of trophy Smallmouth Bass was observed, suggesting an effective regulation. However, a before-after-control-impact (BACI) study design and analysis indicated the slot limit regulation was not likely contributing to the observed increases in Smallmouth Bass size structure. Indeed, similar changes in size structure were observed in abutting Lakes Oahe and Francis Case, suggesting a Missouri River system-wide affect was responsible for observed population changes. Subsequently, the protective slot limit regulation was removed from Lake Sharpe in 2012.

Monday January 28, 2019 3:20pm - 3:40pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

3:40pm EST

(FISHERIES: INVASIVE SPECIES 1) Intensive Harvest of Bigheaded Carps Using the Unified Method in a Floodplain Lake in Missouri, USA
AUTHORS: Jeffrey C. Jolley, Duane C. Chapman, Katelyn M. Lawson – US Geological Survey; Wyatt J. Doyle, US Fish and Wildlife Service; Kevin J. Meneau, Missouri Department of Conservation

ABSTRACT: Intensive and efficient harvest methods for invasive Asian carp in the Mississippi River Basin may alleviate negative effects of overabundance and are desired by fisheries managers.  Commercial desirability of these fish may provide economic benefits, as well.  We conducted a mass harvest at Creve Coeur Lake, Missouri using the Unified Method which was developed by Chinese fishers for harvesting carp from floodplain production lakes.  The method consists of using a variety of driving, herding, and netting techniques, in unison, to concentrate large numbers of fish from large waterbodies to a defined collection location.  We used a combination of boat electrofishing, electrified trawling, and boat-mounted acoustic deterrents to drive fish from a series of block-netted cells in the lake to concentrate fish.  Driving methods were extremely successful and 80% of the lake was mostly cleared of fish in seven days of work.  Fish behavior eventually changed when high concentrations were created and driving methods had greatly reduced effectiveness.  Fish were not successfully driven into an Iruka-style stownet likely due to a combination of water depth, physical location, and mouth opening size.  We used beach seining techniques using block nets to capture large schools of fish that had formed.  Four seine hauls resulted in 108 metric tons of Asian carp removed from the lake.  Preliminary estimates suggest that at least 50% of the Asian carp (> 40,000 fish) were harvested from the lake.  Analyses of companion environmental DNA, hyrdoacoustics, and mark-recapture data will provide additional information on efficiency of harvest. 

Monday January 28, 2019 3:40pm - 4:00pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

4:00pm EST

(FISHERIES: INVASIVE SPECIES 1) History and Issues in Controlling the Bighead and Silver Carps in the Mississippi Basin
AUTHORS: Maurice Sadowsky, President, MJSTI Corp.

ABSTRACT: The bighead and silver carps (combined bigheaded) are an alien invasive species that escaped from aquaculture around 1980.  About 35 years later an estimated 12 to 30 million fish inhabit about 6,400 miles of the Mississippi Basin.  Every year the fish expand their territory and or their bio-mass density on the margins of their habit.The paper uses literature and Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee (ACRCC) and other government reports to review the programs to control these fish.  The ACRCC funds three major efforts: barriers, education/early detection/enforcement and population control.  Each division will be reviewed.The paper will then discuss the realities of controlling the bigheaded carp.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:00pm - 4:20pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

4:00pm EST

(FISHERIES: FISH CONSERVATION) Evaluating Remote Site Incubators: Implications for the Reintroduction of Arctic Grayling in Michigan
AUTHORS: Alan J. Mock, Carl R. Ruetz III – Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University; Dan Mays, Archie Martell – Little River Band of Ottawa Indians

ABSTRACT: The Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was extirpated from Michigan by 1936, and subsequent efforts to reintroduce the species to Michigan have failed. However, efforts to restore the species in Montana have been successful through the use of remote site incubators (RSIs), which allow Arctic grayling to be reared and stocked at the site of introduction. Due to a renewed interest in reestablishing Arctic grayling in Michigan, we conducted a study using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs as surrogates for Arctic grayling to evaluate RSIs in three tributaries of the Manistee River to support the reintroduction effort. We installed eight single-tank RSIs (single 19-L bucket) and one stock-tank RSI (265-L trough) at each study stream. Our objectives were to: 1) test whether the removal of dead eggs and alevins from single-tank RSIs affected hatching success, and 2) compare hatching success between two different RSI designs (i.e., single-tank and stock-tank RSIs). Survival—our measure of hatching success that accounted for swim-out and alevins that remained in RSIs—ranged from 40.3% to 42.4% (mean=41.4%) across the three study streams. Mean survival in picked RSIs (45.6%) was not significantly different from unpicked RSIs (44.4%; p>0.1).  Mean survival in stock-tank RSIs was 37.2%. Survival between stock-tank and single-tank RSIs by stream differed from 1.8% to 10.3% (mean=5.3%). Our preliminary results suggests that differences in hatching success may not be biologically relevant between the two RSI designs we tested, and that removing dead individuals from RSIs during incubation did not significantly increase hatching success.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:00pm - 4:20pm EST
CENTER STREET ROOM C

4:20pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-01) Crappies in Ohio: Building a General Approach to Determining Regulation Success Based on Standard Fish Population Assessments and Angler Feedback
AUTHORS: Joseph D. Conroy, Jeremy J. Pritt, Kevin S. Page, Stephen M. Tyszko, Richard D. Zweifel – Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife

ABSTRACT: Crappie harvest regulations seek to increase yield by allowing additional growth before anglers remove fish from the population.  Density-dependent slow growth, stunting, potential for overharvest, angler preferences for larger crappies, and angler preferences for regulations all present challenges to successfully managing crappie fisheries by using harvest regulations.  In Ohio, minimum length limits for harvest and daily bag limits have been used to regulate crappie populations since the early 1990s, with regulations enacted at more than 40 reservoirs by 2010.  The success of these regulations was assessed by examining changes in abundance (CPUE of age-2 crappies and older), growth (mean length at age 2), and size structure (PSD of harvestable-sized fish) from standard assessments conducted during the period 2003–2017.  Further, we determined angler satisfaction with the numbers and sizes of crappies caught post-regulation along with their support for the regulation from interviews during creel surveys and from postcard surveys during 2017.  Using linear mixed models, we found that in general the regulation led to increased crappie abundance, slowed growth, and changed size structure; the regulation benefited crappie populations more in larger (> 1,000 ha) and more productive (total phosphorus concentrations > 75 micrograms/L) reservoirs.  Angler satisfaction (percent satisfied) with the numbers of crappies caught ranged 30–68% and with the sizes of crappies caught ranged 24–72%, yet there was clear support for both the minimum length limit (percent support ranged 64–92%) and the daily bag limit (66–93%) with little opposition (percent opposition was < 11%) to the regulation.  These analyses ultimately led to removing the minimum length limit and daily bag regulation at 13 reservoirs.  More importantly, however, a general approach to regulation evaluation was developed, which includes analysis of standardized data on both fish populations and their anglers.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:20pm - 4:40pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

4:20pm EST

(FISHERIES: INVASIVE SPECIES 1) Examination of a Modular Electrical Barrier for Deterring Fish Movements
AUTHORS: Scott F Collins, Anthony Porreca, Michael Nannini, Joseph Parkos III, David Wahl – INHS

ABSTRACT: A modular electrical barrier (MEB) was developed as a tool to deter or disrupt the movement of fishes for the purposes of an adaptive approach to pest management.  The design required a non-physical barrier that would not impede boat traffic or floating debris, sufficient power to generate an electrical field at a diverse set of locations, modularity such that the MEB can be transported to logistically feasible locations, and be safely operable by fisheries professionals. The MEB system consists of generators which provide power to one or multiple 5-kW pulsers which modulate the electrical output to the electrodes (anode and cathode steel cables).  Individual pulsers can be linked to fit location dimensions (depth, width, conductivity). To test the effectiveness of the MEB, we conducted an experiment consisting of two trials in separate 0.4-ha ponds.  For each trial, we constructed a large RFID antenna (1 × 30 m) and PIT-tagged (23 × 3.85 mm HDX tags) individual fish from 8 species (4 invasive, 3 native) in order to track fish activity (total detections; average detections) in response to operation of the MEB.  When the MEB was off, ambient fish activity ranged from 500-1600 detections per day.  While the MEB was on, the number of fish detections dropped to only 7 total (6 or 0.05% of trial 1; 1 or 0.01% of trial 2), and most detections were associated with fish mortality.  After the MEB was turned off, fish detections increased after a few hours, and fish activity returned to peak numbers after 4.5 days.  Findings from this experiment indicate that the MEB can greatly deter fish movements; however, like all non-physical barriers, it may not be 100% effective at stopping fish.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:20pm - 4:40pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

4:40pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-01) A Portfolio Approach to Integrated Assessment and Research Can Provide a Larger Context for the Successful Evaluation of Fisheries Harvest Regulations
AUTHORS: Martha E. Mather, U. S. Geological Survey, Kansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Division of Biology, Kansas State University; John M. Dettmers, Great Lakes Fishery Commission; Roy A. Stein, Aquatic Ecology Laboratory, The Ohio State University; Donna L. Parrish, U.S. Geological Survey, Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Vermont; David Glover, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

ABSTRACT: Harvest regulations are essential tools that fisheries managers use to alter fish populations and achieve angler satisfaction. Evaluation of regulations is essential but evaluating all regulations for all species in all systems across multiple time periods is not logistically feasible. Thus, a strategic plan that identifies what regulations need to be evaluated where, when, and how can assist effective decision-making. Specifically, an integrated framework of assessment and research (i.e., the portfolio approach) can provide a larger context in which to design, implement, and interpret harvest regulation evaluations. Using examples, we illustrate this multi-step approach. First, a shared vision for individual fisheries (species, system, individual population, goal) that is jointly created by a collaborative group of researchers and managers is essential. Second, using a series of linked questions, objectives, and goals, the collaborative team can conceptualize (a) desired outcomes of specific harvest regulations given population characteristics, (b) challenges to achieving those outcomes, and (c) data needed to differentiate among population responses to regulations. Third, by applying a portfolio of interacting data types (e.g., assessment, applied research, basic science, synthesis), researchers and managers can operationalize a pathway to achieve the desired angler outcome given existing population conditions. Fourth, by using rigorous scientific principles, the team can improve all aspects of assessment and research. Specifically, a strategic plan that considers multiple starting population conditions, a range of harvest regulations, and different angler outcomes can integrate all assessment and research data to better inform management decisions. Fifth, adhering to a set of agreed-upon, regularly-evaluated 10-year goals allows fisheries professionals to track progress and plan next steps. Although agencies face different challenges across species, systems, and populations, all can advance successful science-based management by utilizing components of this portfolio approach for harvest regulation evaluation.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:40pm - 5:00pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

4:40pm EST

(CANCELLED) (SYMPOSIA-04) Density and Biomass of Drifting Macroinvertebrates in the Upper St. Marys River: A Comparison of the Power Canal and Main Rapids
AUTHORS: Tristan Tackman (Student); Dr. Ashely Moerke (Professor/Undergraduate Advisor); Jake Larsen (Graduate) – School of Natural Resources and Environment, Lake Superior State University

ABSTRACT: The St. Marys River is the only outflow of Lake Superior and feeds both Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. The river itself rears a majority of these lakes’ sports fishes by providing ample spawning grounds; these young fish rely on small macroinvertebrates for most of their growth in early years. The objective of this study was to quantify and compare the supply of drifting invertebrates from the main rapids and the hydropower canal in an effort to understand key food sources available for fishes in the river.  To do so, two larval drift nets were set overnight in the rapids and canal to collect drifting invertebrates during the months of May and June 2016.  For each date biomass was calculated asash free dry weight and density was calculated as number of invertebrates per 100m<sup>3</sup>. Densities were the highest for Hydropsychidae and Mysidae at both sites, andcomprised 18% (the remanding 82% being non-dominant taxa) and 9.5% in the rapids and 26.7% and 8.9% in the canal site. Although Mysidaedensities were higher than other taxa, Hydropsychidae contributed more biomass to the system in both sites during May and June of 2016. Additionally, total drift densities were 2.4 times higher in the canal site than the rapids, suggesting that the canal is a better source of invertebrates to the St. Marys River. The canal is likely drawing water from more offshore areas in Lake Superior, which may explain the higher numbers of drifting Mysids in the canal site compared to the rapids.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:40pm - 5:00pm EST
CENTER STREET ROOM A

4:40pm EST

(FISHERIES: INVASIVE SPECIES 1) Selective, Safe and Low Cost Piscicide
AUTHORS: Maurice Sadowsky, President, MJSTI Corp.

ABSTRACT: MJSTI proved a selective, safe and low-cost fish pesticide with the goal of controlling the bighead and silver carps (bigheaded carps).  The technology and experiments will be discussed and compared to the USGS antimycin A/beeswax formulation (with patent lawyers’ approval).  The US patent should be submitted in 2018.  The formulation is selective as a digestive poison.  It is safe using FDA additives.  The average raw material cost is 1/12 to 1/30<sup>th</sup> of MJSTI’s estimated USGS antimycin A/beeswax raw material cost.  The EPA registration should be for a new formulation since the component chemicals are all EPA registered pesticide ingredients.  The technology has application for other fish including common carp and potentially grass carp.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:40pm - 5:00pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

4:40pm EST

(FISHERIES: HABITAT) Assessment of the Accuracy of Spatially Interpolated Brook Trout Habitat in Northeast Minnesota Streams
AUTHORS: Kathryn Renik, Dr. Andrew Hafs, Dr. Jeffrey Ueland – Bemidji State University

ABSTRACT: Developments in geographic information systems (GIS) and improved global positioning system (GPS) unit accuracy have allowed for advancement and are increasingly being used to collect spatial data in ecological studies. Benefits include decreased error in the field and ease of usability, allowing for quicker and more accurate field measurements. The objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy of predicted Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis habitat from spatially interpolated GIS maps generated using a Trimble Geo7x handheld GPS unit. Brook Trout habitat variables were collected at data points throughout 40 (200m) stream reaches during summer 2018 in Northeastern Minnesota. Data was recorded directly onto the Geo7x GPS unit and two different data point types were collected, data points for creating interpolated habitat maps (“map data points”) and reference data points.  A habitat suitability index model was utilized to predict Brook Trout habitat and produce spatially interpolated GIS maps by kriging. Quantification of interpolated map accuracy was determined by comparing the interpolated values to the reference data points. An error matrix was used to calculate overall accuracy, user’s accuracy, producer’s accuracy, and the kappa coefficient, allowing us to determine the ability of interpolated maps to accurately predict Brook Trout habitat. Accurate Brook Trout habitat maps provide management not only with tools to successfully manage the species, but also with illustrative visual aides that allow for improved communication within agencies and among the public.

Monday January 28, 2019 4:40pm - 5:00pm EST
CENTER STREET ROOM B
 
Tuesday, January 29
 

10:20am EST

(SYMPOSIA-07) Using Acoustic Telemetry to Re-establish Historic Fisheries
AUTHORS: Cameron Goble, Hilary Meyer, Mark Fincel, Chelsey Pasbrig – South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks; Dylan Turner, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

ABSTRACT: Acoustic telemetry is often used to document fish behavior including survival, movement and habitat use. We used information from a combination of a passive acoustic receiver arrays, active tracking, and fisheries assessments to evaluate the potential to reestablish historic Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) and Shovelnose Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) fisheries in Lake Sharpe, a Missouri River impoundment in central South Dakota.  In 2015, South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began stocking paddlefish into Lake Sharpe to reestablish a sport fishery last open in 1964. We used acoustic telemetry to document movement patterns and habitat use of translocated adult paddlefish (n =40) and determine post-stocking dispersal and survival of age-0 paddlefish (n = 50). We used information from seasonal movement patterns of translocated adult paddlefish to assess the feasibility of creating a shore based recreational fishery.  Post-stocking dispersal rates of age-0 paddlefish was used to prioritize future stocking locations. We also used acoustic telemetry to document movement and population dynamics (recruitment, growth, mortality) of a remnant Shovelnose Sturgeon (n = 50) population in Lake Sharpe. A combination of acoustic telemetry and a mark-recapture study will provide information on basic population demographics of Shovelnose Sturgeon in Lake Sharpe.  We will incorporate Shovelnose Sturgeon population dynamics into modeling software (e.g. FAMS) to set appropriate harvest regulations for Shovelnose Sturgeon.  Here, we provide a case study of using acoustic telemetry paired with traditional fisheries assessment tools as important components of fisheries management decision making in South Dakota.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 10:20am - 10:40am EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

10:40am EST

(SYMPOSIA-07) Biotelemetry Informing Management: Case Studies Exploring Successful Integration of Biotelemetry Data into Fisheries and Habitat Management
AUTHORS: Jill L. Brooks, Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab, Carleton University; Jacqueline M. Chapman, Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab, Carleton University; Amanda N. Barkley, University of Windsor; Steven T. Kessel, Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation and Research, John G. Shedd Aquarium; Nigel E. Hussey, University of Windsor; Scott G. Hinch, Pacific Salmon Ecology and Conservation Laboratory, University of British Columbia; David A. Patterson, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Kevin J. Hedges, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Steven J. Cooke, Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab, Carleton University; Aaron T. Fisk, University of Windsor; Samuel H. Gruber, Bimini Biological Field Station Foundation; Vivian M. Nguyen, Natural Resources Canada.

ABSTRACT: Biotelemetry data have been successfully incorporated into aspects of fishery and fish habitat management, however, the processes of knowledge mobilization are rarely published in peer-reviewed literature but are valuable and of interest to conservation scientists. Here, we explore case examples from the Great Lakes Acoustic Telemetry Observation System (GLATOS) and the Ocean Tracking Network (OTN), ranging from Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in BC, Canada, Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) in Cumberland Sound, Canada, and lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) in Florida, USA to document key processes for science-integration. Typical recommendations documented in the literature (e.g., co-production of knowledge, transdisciplinary methodologies, applied research questions) were recorded to have had successful fisheries management integration, although we documented some exceptions. In each case, it was early, active and ongoing communication outside of traditional science communication and the visual evidence of fish movement that were critical in engaging all parties with a vested interest. Networks offer forums for knowledge sharing on lessons learned and development of skills to engage in active communication. Greater investments and attention to develop these skills are needed to foster positive and active relationships that can impart real change in management and conservation.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 10:40am - 11:00am EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

10:40am EST

(CANCELLED) (SYMPOSIA-09) Development of Carbon Dioxide as a Tool for Invasive Fish Management
AUTHORS: Aaron Cupp, U.S. Geological Survey; David Smith, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Cory Suski, University of Illinois; Kim Fredricks, U.S. Geological Survey

ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2</sub>) is being developed as a new fisheries control chemical. Several recent studies have demonstrated that fish consistently avoid areas of elevated CO<sub>2</sub> when given access to other freshwater sources. Results from these studies suggest that resource managers could apply CO<sub>2</sub> at pinch-point or other key management locations within rivers to block upstream migration of invasive fishes (e.g. Asian carps, sea lamprey, round goby). A full-scale demonstration of this deterrent technology is being planned for 2019 at a navigational lock to better determine the costs, effectiveness, safety and overall feasibility of CO<sub>2</sub> as a fish deterrent method. In addition to using CO<sub>2</sub> as a behavioral deterrent, other recent studies have also demonstrated that CO<sub>2</sub> is an effective non-selective piscicide (fish toxicant). Carbon dioxide injected under-ice using various delivery methods was effective at reducing the overwinter survival of several non-native cyprinids. Further development of CO<sub>2</sub> as a piscicide could give managers an inexpensive, safe, and effective method to control invasive fish populations. Results from previous studies using CO<sub>2</sub> as a behavioral deterrent and piscicide will be discussed with specific focus on upcoming field studies aimed at transitioning CO<sub>2</sub> into a useful management tool.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 10:40am - 11:00am EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

10:40am EST

(FISHERIES: LAKES & RESERVOIRS) Age and Growth of Blue Catfish in Two North-Central Kansas Reservoirs
AUTHORS: Ernesto Flores, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism; William J. Stark, Fort Hays State University

ABSTRACT: Age information is a management tool used by fisheries biologists to characterize populations. The Blue Catfish (Ictaluris furcatus) is a riverine species that grow to trophy lengths and have been introduced into Kansas Reservoirs. Blue Catfish were introduced into Wilson Reservoir in 2006 and Lovewell Reservoir in 2010 with a common management objective, establishing a trophy fishery. Standard sampling protocol (SSP) has misrepresented the Blue Catfish population status in both reservoirs; a targeted sampling effort was conducted in the summer of 2016 in Lovewell Reservoir using low-pulse electrofishing and in 2017 using float-lines to gain insight on the population structure. A total 170 fish were collected from Wilson Reservoir with a TL ranging 210-860 mm. We sampled Lovewell Reservoir and collected 146 individuals ranging from 220-860 mm. Pectoral spines were collected from each individual and used for aging. Annual stockings were scheduled for Lovewell reservoir from 2010-2014 approximately at 1 fish/acre excluding the year 2013 stocking at 0.33 fish/acre. Age 6 fish comprised 52% of the sample, 2% at age 5, 13% age 4, 3% age 3, 23% age 2, and 4% age 1. Wilson Blue Catfish stocking rates were conducted at 2 fish/acre in 2006 and 2008; stocking rates were 1 fish/acre in 2007, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2016. Age 11 fish made up 13% of the sample, age 10 at 49%, 36% were age 9, and 7% age 1. Age classes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 were not represented in the sample. Detection of these missing year classes may have been caused by low lake levels during this time period.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 10:40am - 11:00am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM C

11:20am EST

(SYMPOSIA-09) The Use of Carbon Dioxide to Remove Resident Piscivorous Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis) from the Tracy Fish Collection Facility in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California
AUTHORS: Brandon J. Wu, Rene C. Reyes, Christopher L. Hart – U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Kevin K. Kumagai, HTI-VEMCO USA, Inc.; Scott A. Porter, Michael R. Trask – U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

ABSTRACT: As an integral part of the Central Valley Project, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), Tracy Fish Collection Facility (TFCF; Byron, California) functions to salvage fish from Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta water exported south by the C.W. “Bill” Jones Pumping Plant.  Predation by resident piscivorous fish is a contributing factor to fish loss at the TFCF and Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis) are generally considered the most prevalent piscivorous fish species within the facility.  To improve fish salvage and meet requirements mandated by the most recent National Marine Fisheries Service Biological Opinion, Reclamation is investigating the use of carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2</sub>) as an anesthetic to remove predatory fish from the TFCF system.  The treatment of various water conveyance channels and components of the TFCF with CO<sub>2</sub> has demonstrated that elevated CO<sub>2 </sub>concentrations (50–350 mg/L) increase the number and size of Striped Bass in collection tanks (salvaged), suggesting that this application is feasible and effective.  In addition, acoustically tagged Striped Bass appeared to exhibit an avoidance response to elevated CO<sub>2</sub> concentrations.  The removal of acoustically tagged and wild Striped Bass during CO<sub>2</sub> treatment allowed for calculation of removal efficiency as well as estimation of Striped Bass population within the TFCF system at the time of testing.  Efforts are currently underway to estimate optimal CO<sub>2</sub> concentration for removal of Striped Bass based on removal efficiency and 96-hour post treatment survival.  Preliminary results suggest that the optimal CO<sub>2</sub> concentration for Striped Bass removal is approximately 165 mg/L.  Future efforts will focus on increasing removal efficiency in TFCF collection tanks as well as developing methods to direct piscivorous fish out of the facility to a location where there is no impact on salvageable fish.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 11:20am - 11:40am EST
HOPE BALLROOM C

11:20am EST

(FISHERIES: LAKES & RESERVOIRS) Evaluating Growth of Angled Bluegill Relative to the Randomly Sampled Population
AUTHORS: Ben C. Neely, Jeff D. Koch, Connor J. Chance-Ossowski – Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism

ABSTRACT: Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus contribute to unique fisheries in Kansas where they fill many niches. One niche that has been gaining recent attention from anglers is pursuit of large individuals. These efforts typically occur during the Bluegill spawn in May and June when anglers can visually target nest-guarding fish. A combination of being visually evident and aggressively defending nests makes Bluegill especially susceptible to angler harvest during this time. There is concern that harvest of nest-tending Bluegill may remove the fastest growing individuals from the population and ultimately results in populations that do not support quality Bluegill fisheries. To this end, Bluegill were sampled from 14 Kansas impoundments with both fall electrofishing at random shoreline locations and spring angling for nest-tending individuals in 2017 and 2018. Total length was recorded from all captured individuals and otoliths were collected from up to five individuals per centimeter group for age and growth estimation. In all impoundments, length distribution of sampled bluegill differed between gears with angled fish shifted toward larger individuals. Similarly, angled fish exhibited more rapid growth than randomly sampled individuals in some populations. These results highlight the vulnerability of the fastest growing individuals in bluegill populations to angler harvest while preparing and guarding spawning sites. Further, these results suggest that instituting some level of protection to nest-guarding Bluegill might result in increased size structure and promote development and maintenance of quality Bluegill fisheries.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 11:20am - 11:40am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM C

11:20am EST

(FISHERIES: INVERTEBRATES) Evaluating Impacts of Rainbow Trout Farming on Macroinvertebrates in Neotropical Streams in Ecuador
AUTHORS: Dana G. Wessels, Biology Department, Grand Valley State University; Dr. Katherine Krynak, Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences, Ohio Northern University; Dr. Ed Krynak, Department of Geography, Western University; Andrea Encalada, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador; Dr. Eric Snyder, Biology Department, Grand Valley State University

ABSTRACT: Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) aquaculture has increased to accommodate growing human populations, but streams throughout the world are being adversely affected in the process. Understanding how stream ecosystems respond to trout farm effluent is necessary to propose well-informed management practices before habitat and biotic loss become unrecoverable. Our research compared macroinvertebrate communities and environmental parameters along two streams in the Pichincha region of Ecuador; one stream with five non-native rainbow trout farms, and the other stream without trout farms. Macroinvertebrates collected in non-trout farm and headwater (control) sites were compared to those collected at the outflow of the five trout farms. An analysis of similarity based on the non-metric multidimensional scaling analyses (NMDS) of the macroinvertebrate families in qualitative kick samples as well as the EPT genera from the Surber samples showed a significant difference between the three sampling groups (Global R = 0.536, p = 0.004 and Global R = 0.639, p = 0.001 respectively). SIMPER analyses determined the families and genera that contributed the greatest proportion of dissimilarity between the trout farm, non-trout farm, and headwater groups. The Andean Biotic Index pollution tolerance values and functional feeding groups of the most influential families were examined. AICc model selection and model averaging was used to evaluate potential environmental influence on macroinvertebrate community similarity. Model averaged parameter estimates of the interaction between specific conductivity (SC) and percent organic matter (OM) was predictive of the macroinvertebrate community differences between sampling sites from the kick samples. Our results indicated reduced water quality due to the effects of rainbow trout farm effluent. However, treatment methods are limited in this mountainous terrain. Therefore, we would suggest feeding efficiency and utilization of trout farm sludge as fertilizer to minimize the impact of these farms on the neotropical streams.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 11:20am - 11:40am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM B

11:40am EST

(CANCELLED) (SYMPOSIA-07) Spawning Site Contribution and Movements of Lake Whitefish in Northwestern Lake Michigan
AUTHORS: Daniel Isermann, U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Fishery Research Unit; Tom Binder, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University-Hammond Bay Biological Station; Scott Hansen, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; David Caroffino, Michigan Department of Natural Resources; Daniel Dembkowski, Wisconsin Cooperative Fishery Research Unit; Charles Krueger, Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; Christopher Vandergoot, U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center, Lake Erie Biological Station; Wesley Larson, U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Fishery Research Unit

ABSTRACT: Lake whitefish support important commercial and recreational fisheries on Lake Michigan, with the northern third of the lake supporting the majority of harvest. Previous genetic analyses indicated lake whitefish harvest in northwest Lake Michigan was largely supported (˜ 75%) by fish assigned to Big Bay de Noc (BBDN) and North and Moonlight bays (NMB) genetic stocks. Previous tagging suggested the BBDN stock spawned on reefs within BBDN and were usually recovered by the fishery in Green Bay north of Chambers Island or along the lake side of the Door Peninsula. Most fish from the NMB stock were thought to spawn on reefs along the lake side of Door Peninsula and the majority of tags were recovered along both sides of the Door Peninsula. While these previous studies suggested lake whitefish show relatively high spawning site fidelity, determining whether these two stocks are functionally discrete remains an important question for fishery managers. Additionally, lake whitefish assigning to multiple stocks now spawn in tributaries to Green Bay (primarily the Fox and Menominee rivers) where spawning had not been observed for nearly a century; the movements of these fish are largely unknown. We implanted acoustic transmitters in 400 lake whitefish at four different spawning locations (BBDN, NMB, Fox and Menominee rivers) during November 2017. Use of acoustic telemetry coupled with genomics will allow us to test current understanding of lake whitefish stock structure and describe stock-specific movements and spatial distribution relative to fishing effort. We will present preliminary results from the first year of our assessment.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 11:40am - 12:00pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

1:20pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-07) Paddlefish Migration: Evidence to Support Need for Interjurisdictional Management
AUTHORS: Sara Tripp, Missouri Department of Conservation; Dr. Quinton Phelps, West Virginia University; David Herzog, Missouri Department of Conservation

ABSTRACT: The scale of policy required to effectively manage or restore species that cross jurisdictional boundaries is a critical component for sustainability across a species’ range. Many riverine fish species (i.e., Paddlefish) range far beyond state boundaries; which makes existing state-by state management strategies null when conservation and sustainability goals differ widely. Before management strategies can be implemented, quantifying movement patterns is necessary to determine the appropriate spatial scale for management. Prior information collected using tag return data, has shown long-range movements for Paddlefish, but the proportion of the population making these movements is often underestimated from this type of data. Because of this, we investigated broad scale movement patterns of Paddlefish in the Mississippi River using acoustic telemetry. With the increasing use of this technology, researchers throughout the Mississippi River Basin now have access to a stationary receiver array that spans from Minnesota down to Louisiana and includes all major tributaries and many other locations. Without, the sharing of data among states and agencies, this type of data collection and analysis is not feasible. After summarizing more than a million detections from over 200 Paddlefish implanted with transmitters throughout the Mississippi Rivers, the data suggests that over 50% of the paddlefish tagged are migratory and moving freely among rivers (e.g., Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, and Ohio rivers) across many political boundaries and encompassing multiple regulatory agencies. This type of information regarding spatial bounds is now being incorporated with population demographic information to develop a basin wide management plan that could be implemented in portions of the Paddlefish range.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 1:20pm - 1:40pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

2:00pm EST

(CANCELLED) (FISHERIES: EARLY LIFE HISTORY) Larval Drift Sampling for Scaphirhynchus Sturgeon in the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers
AUTHORS: Kevin Haupt, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Hae Kim, West Virginia University Division of Forestry and Natural Resources; Donovan Henry, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Sara Tripp, Big Rivers and Wetlands Field Station Missouri Department of Conservation; Quinton Phelps, West Virginia University Division of Forestry and Natural Resources

ABSTRACT: Larval fish sampling can provide insight into early life vital rates, abundance, and drift dynamics. In riverine environments, larval fish drift dynamics may influence early-life survival. Further, field and lab studies have shown that drift dynamics vary across species. Thus, information during this life stage is imperative for proper conservation and management of riverine fishes. However, successfully sampling larval fishes in riverine environments presents various challenges (e.g., spatial and temporal coverage and sampling effectiveness). As it relates to Scaphirhynchus sturgeon, these challenges are exasperated when targeting larvae in fast flowing reaches of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. Prior research suggests that Scaphirhynchus sturgeon are benthic post-hatch. Our objectives were to determine drift dynamics and origin of Pallid Sturgeon in the Missouri River, Middle Mississippi River, and Upper Mississippi. We sampled in river reaches above and below the confluence of the Misssouri River, above chain of rocks and below chain of rocks on the middle Mississippi. We employed two 1000µm mesh, rectangular framed-nets off both sides of the boat. Weights (45kg) were affixed to the bottom of each net, to keep nets upright. Additionally, flow-meters were affixed to the mouth of the nets to measure volume of water filtered. Nets were deployed from the boat via an electric winch. Sampling commenced in mid April and ended in late June.  Overall, approximately 3,500 larval drift samples were collected during the study period.  Preliminary results indicate we have captured drifting Scaphirhynchus sturgeon throughout the water column (i.e., surface, middle, and bottom) at all river reaches.  To this end, employing larval drift nets throughout the water column may provide additional insight into Scaphirhynchus sturgeon life history that will inform conservation and management of these species.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 2:00pm - 2:20pm EST
CENTER STREET ROOM B

3:20pm EST

(FISHERIES: BIG RIVERS) Identifying Catostomid Larvae Using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to Better Understand Reproduction Within Large River Systems
AUTHORS: Kellie N. Hanser, Cassi Moody-Carpenter, Jordan Pesik – Eastern Illinois University; Dan Roth, Indiana Department of Natural Resources; Aaron Schrey, Gerogia Southern University-Armstrong Campus; Anthony Porreca, Kaskaskia Biological Station: Illinois Natural History Survey; Robert E. Colombo, Eastern Illinois University

ABSTRACT: Catostomidae, the third largest freshwater fish family, comprises a high percentage of fish biomass in river systems throughout North America. Despite their presence, there is little information on the reproductive life history for this family in large, midwestern rivers and their tributaries. To address this, we sampled larval fish in three tributaries of both the Illinois River and Wabash River in conjunction with environmental data collected on factors thought to be important for reproduction. Between 2016 and 2017, we collected 130 and 2626 catostomid larvae from the Illinois and Wabash River tributaries, respectively. Due to the morphological difficulty of identifying catostomid larvae past family taxonomic level, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) was used to identify catostomid larvae to either genus or species. Results of larvae identification are still pending due to processing time. We expect Wabash River tributaries to have a higher abundance of Moxostoma(Redhorse) while the Illinois River tributaries will have a higher abundance in Ictiobus(Buffalo) due to differences in connectivity between the systems. Future research will examine the relationship between larval and adult catostomid abundance in the Illinois and Wabash River systems.   

Tuesday January 29, 2019 3:20pm - 3:40pm EST
CENTER STREET ROOM B

4:00pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-07) Incision Healing Rate of Shortnose Gars Using Novel Surgical Methods for Transmitter Implantation
AUTHORS: Sarah King, Illinois Natural History Survey; Jeffrey A. Stein, Illinois Natural History Survey/University of Illinois

ABSTRACT: Knowledge regarding the movement of wild fishes provides valuable information of their spatial ecology, habitat use, and migration patterns. Telemetry methods utilizing either radio or acoustic signals require that a transmitter be affixed to the animal, introducing the potential for adverse effects on the natural movements of study animals. Intracoelemic transmitter implantation has been documented to have limited adverse effects and is considered the best method for long-term tracking relative to gastric insertion or external attachment. Surgical procedures describing transmitter implantation are well known in the literature, however, these methods cannot be used on more primitive fishes such as Lepisosteids due to the complexity of their armored, ganoid scales. External transmitter attachments have only been used on gars because it is not possible to breech ganoid scales using traditional surgical methods. Recently, Midwood et al. (2018) described a new procedure to implant transmitters in the body cavity of Longnose Gars in Lake Ontario. The surgical procedure was deemed successful based on detection rates of the majority of fish up to 3 months post tagging; however, individual post-surgery data was unavailable due to the lack of recaptured individuals over time. To further our knowledge on the survival and healing rate using these novel surgical techniques, we conducted a sham surgery study on Shortnose Gar in a controlled laboratory setting to monitor post-surgery impacts over time. Forty-seven gar were subjected to one of three treatment groups; control, sedation only, or sedation and sham surgery, and monitored over a period of 68 days. Results from our study provide insight to the expected healing rate and survival of gars using intracoelemic transmitter attachment methods in a field setting.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 4:00pm - 4:20pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

4:20pm EST

(SYMPOSIA-07) Using a Simplified Approach to Analyzing Acoustic Telemetry Data and Identifying Sea Lamprey Spawning Areas in the St. Clair Detroit River System
AUTHORS: Michael Lowe, Christopher Holbrook – USGS, Hammond Bay Biological Station; Darryl Hondorp, USGS Great Lakes Science Center; Aaron Jubar, USFWS Ludington Biological Station; Jessica Barber, USFWS Marquette Biological Station; Kevin Tallon, DFO Canada Sea Lamprey Control Centre

ABSTRACT: Despite continued monitoring and control efforts, the invasive Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) population in Lake Erie during 2009 was the highest in the time series and has since remained above target levels set by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC).  It was hypothesized that Sea Lamprey production in the St. Clair and Detroit River system (SCDRS), which had undergone extensive restoration in recent years and was historically excluded from control efforts, has been under-estimated.  We present the results of a 2014 pilot study (n = 27 fish) and a larger study spanning 2016 (n = 125 fish) and 2017 (n = 125 fish) that used acoustic-tagged adult sea lamprey to identify potential spawning areas in the SCDRS.  In doing so, we introduce a new statistical method for summarizing and analyzing multidimensional fish movement data.  Our analysis of the 2014 pilot study data is congruent with a previous analysis of those same data using a more complex multinomial process model.  Both analyses show similar detection probabilities and behavioral aspects of sea lamprey movements, and ultimately reach the same conclusion: most Sea Lamprey spawning occurred in the lower half of the St. Clair River.  The 2016 and 2017 study, which had more fish and a more extensive array of acoustic receivers, further reduced the potential spawning area down to the middle St. Clair River between the mouth of the Belle River and Stag Island. The combined results of these studies address several needs identified by the GLFC and are expected to inform and guide alternative assessment and control strategies in the SCDRS.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 4:20pm - 4:40pm EST
HOPE BALLROOM A

4:40pm EST

(CANCELLED) (SYMPOSIA-11) Improving Methods to Understand the Role of Predation on Dreissenid Population Dynamics
AUTHORS: Kevin R. Keretz; Richard T. Kraus, Joseph Schmitt – US Geological Survey

ABSTRACT: Ecological and societal impacts of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena spp.) on Great Lakes ecosystems are well documented, and a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause variation in mussel abundance is needed.  An outstanding question is how much mussel biomass is consumed by predation. To date, attention has mainly been focused on invasive Round Goby (genus species) predation of mussels.  We note that the biomass of native mussel consumers, such as Freshwater Drum (Aplodinotus grunniens), may exceed Round Goby biomass by an order of magnitude in some areas.  Thus, the role of predation on mussel population dynamics may be greater than is currently assumed.  A significant difficulty for investigating mussel consumption by native predators is that mussels in stomachs are often a macerated mix of crushed shell and flesh. This prevents counting and measurement of individual prey items as is often performed in diet studies.  Here, we develop an analysis to convert the crushed shell and flesh mixture found in diets of Freshwater Drum to a simple dry weight of mussel flesh.  We then estimate daily ration as a first step in understanding the impact of Freshwater Drum on mussel populations in Lake Erie.  Our results support evaluation of proposed mussel control methods by improving our knowledge of ecological mechanisms that influence mussel abundance.  

Tuesday January 29, 2019 4:40pm - 5:00pm EST
CENTER STREET ROOM A

6:00pm EST

(CANCELLED) (P41) Cheese vs. Worms: A Comparison of Minnow Trap Bait Types for Assessing Nearshore Fish Communities
AUTHORS. Scott Jackson, University of Toledo, Department of Environmental Sciences; Edward Roseman, US Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center; Jason Fischer, University of Toledo, Department of Environmental Sciences; Stacey Ireland, US Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center; Stacy Provo, University of Toledo, Department of Environmental Sciences

ABSTRACT. Minnow traps are a common type of passive fishing gear that can be deployed in a variety of habitats to assess local fish communities. While some studies investigated the efficiency and biases associated with this type of sampling, few studies have assessed the effects of baiting minnow traps with different types of bait. As part of a shoreline restoration project, we conducted bi-weekly minnow trap sampling from spring to fall 2016 in the St. Clair River. Minnow traps were set from the shore in groups of five parallel to the shoreline at 12 different sites along the river. Each trap was baited with Colby Jack cheese one night of the week, and Nightcrawler worms (Lumbricus terrestris) the other. Traps were set late afternoon to early evening and were fished for an average of 13.9 hours/night. Traps baited with cheese caught 1497 individuals belonging to 23 species and traps baited with worms caught 901 individuals from 22 species. Four species were only caught by cheese baited traps and three species were only caught by worm baited traps. Catch-Per-Unit-Effort (CPUE) was calculated for the number of fish caught at a site over a 12-hour sampling period. CPUE of cheese baited traps was higher (6.5 Fish/12 Hours) than worm baited traps (4.1 Fish/12 Hours) (p-value <0.01). Mean species richness (MSR), calculated as the average number of species caught per sampling event, was greater for traps baited with cheese (1.91 species/night) than for traps with worms (1.59 species/night) (p-value<0.01). Based on CPUE and MSR, cheese catches more individuals and more species than worms, however, using both bait types may provide a more complete measure of species richness by catching species attracted to only one type of bait.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(CANCELLED) (P44) Effects of Sedation Techniques on Stress Responses in Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)
AUTHORS. Margaret Thomas, Eastern Illinois University; Anabela Maia, Rhode Island College; Eloy Martinez, Eastern Illinois University; Robert Colombo, Eastern Illinois University

ABSTRACT. The process of sedating fish is necessary for a variety of procedures in research and within field or laboratory settings. Information regarding chemical sedatives, such as MS-222 (99.5% tricaine methanesulfate), suggests that it is often insufficient for field use due to extensive recovery time and withdrawal. Subsequently, alternatives to chemical sedatives are being explored, of which electronarcosis is a popular option. Electronarcosis applies particularly to “immediate-release” situations, as it is found to have rapid recovery times and minimal lasting effects on fish. Few studies provide an overview of the effects of sedation on its subjects, and large gaps remain with regard to the species-specific responses to the treatment. Therefore, we sought to compare the short-term physiological effects of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) subjected to electronarcosis and MS-222 sedation techniques. We hypothesize that sedation achieved by electronarcosis will provide an overall decreased stress response in its subjects. Bluegill sunfish were exposed to species-specific doses of MS-222 or electrical stunning to achieve complete sedation. Immediately following sedation, basal metabolic rates of fish were monitored with indirect calorimetry. Basal metabolic rates were employed as indicators of aerobic physiological activity on fish. Cortisol levels in blood were assayed after metabolic screening and gathered over a period of 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours following treatment on each group and compared to a pre-treatment control. Plasma cortisol levels and metabolic rates are expected to have an overall decreased value in subjects treated with electrosedation, deeming it a more practical alternative to chemical treatments.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(CANCELLED) (P45) Influence of Physical Processes on Transport and Persistence of eDNA from the Invasive Round Goby (Neogobious melanostomus)
AUTHORS. Meredith B. Nevers, Murulee N. Byappanahalli, Kasia Kelly – U.S. Geological Survey; Charles C. Morris, Joshua Dickey – National Park Service

ABSTRACT. Environmental DNA (eDNA) is being explored in a variety of fishery sciences applications: early detection of invasive species, population estimations, or whole community composition.  Questions remain, however, about factors that influence the reliability of eDNA for detecting recent occupation of habitats by a given species.  It is unclear how physical and biological factors (settling, resuspension, dispersion, DNA stability and decay) influence estimations of eDNA concentration.  In a series of field and mesocosm experiments, we examined the transport, accumulation, and persistence of eDNA from the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus).  Experiment 1: caged fish (n=30) were placed in a stream devoid of round goby, and water (1L) and sediment samples (~20g) were collected over 24 hours along a 120-m stretch of the stream.  Sampling continued for 24 hours after fish were removed. Experiment 2: round goby (n=5/tank) were placed in laboratory aquaria, and water (150mL) and sediment (~20g) were collected over 21 days plus another 28 days post-fish removal.  DNA was extracted from all samples, and qPCR was used to target DNA sequences (cytochrome oxidase I gene, COI, specific to round goby).  Results indicated that goby eDNA was readily transported downstream, with signals detected at all sites, but the signal disappeared rapidly after fish removal.  Similarly, eDNA was regularly detected in lab aquaria, but the signal disappeared rapidly in both matrices after fish removal.  Results show that eDNA acts conservatively as an indicator, and detection of an eDNA target would likely indicate recent occupation by the species.  eDNA technology holds great potential for species detection, including those that are hard-to-capture or less abundant in aquatic habitats.  Further research is needed to evaluate resuspension and shoreline interactions in the Great Lakes and how DNA responds to other environmental processes and conditions.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(P38) Validating Daily Otolith Increment Deposition in Aquarium-Reared Juvenile Walleye, Sander Vitreus
AUTHORS. Kaitlin Ulin, L. Zoe Almeida – Ohio State University; Taylor A. Brown, Cornell University; David Dippold, Stuart A. Ludsin, Elizabeth A. Marshall – Ohio State University

ABSTRACT. The daily age and growth rate of a juvenile fish can provide useful information about early life conditions. Researchers frequently take advantage of the fact that fish otoliths accrue daily rings, which can be counted and measured, to estimate ages and growth rates.  Previous studies have indicated, however, that aging juvenile walleye, Sander vitreus, with otolith increments past 42 d is difficult, if not impossible. This difficulty is partially due to the development of accessory primordia (a second growth plane on the otolith), a problem exacerbated by otolith preparation techniques that obscure rings on different planes. Herein, we examined the accuracy of aging walleye before and past 42 d using known-age, aquarium-reared walleye and a modified otolith preparation technique. Our otolith preparation technique involved gently grinding the convex side of the otolith in three planes: the core, the middle, and the edge. By grinding on the convex side, we removed material along a curved axis to allow visibility of rings from the hatch-check to the most recently laid ring and, therefore, allowed us to age the fish from hatch to capture. Walleye were hatched on April 20, 2018 (± 3 d) and reared for 96 d; sagittal otoliths were collected on days 10, 41, 56, 79, and 96 post-hatch. Otoliths were aged by three readers. We are comparing reader estimates of ages to known ages and analyzing among- and within-reader error to determine if error lies within readers’ interpretation of rings, or if accessory primordia inhibit clear interpretation of daily rings past 42 d. Future experiments manipulating temperature will be conducted to confirm if our findings are consistent under different environmental conditions known to affect otolith growth patterns.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(P39) An Evaluation of Angler Use of Fish Attractors in Ohio Reservoirs
AUTHORS. Kevin S. Page, Christopher R. Aman, Matt A. Hangsleben, Matthew D. Wolfe – Ohio Division of Wildlife

ABSTRACT. For over a decade, the Ohio Division of Wildlife (ODOW) has added fish attractors to reservoirs to improve angler fishing success. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the addition of attractors has effectively improved fishing. However, a more quantitative evaluation of the value of adding fish attractors to reservoirs given the costs associated with their deployment, would be useful. We evaluated angler use of attractors by analyzing the spatial distribution of anglers interviewed during on-the-water angler creel surveys conducted during 2014–2016 at 12 reservoirs that had fish attractors.  A Chi-square analysis was used to determine if distributions of anglers showed a preference for areas with fish attractors versus those without.  Anglers were also queried in 2018 at five reservoirs to gauge their levels of awareness and usage of fish attractors, and to collect angler opinions on the effectiveness of attractors at improving fishing. At 4 of 12 reservoirs, boat anglers showed a propensity to use attractors more frequently than expected, whereas shore anglers showed a greater propensity at seven of the reservoirs. It is unclear whether this represents purposeful targeting of attractors by anglers or a function of where attractors were deployed (e.g., near popular fishing locations). The percentage of anglers that were aware of and targeted fish attractors appeared generally low (5–32%).  However, these anglers were generally positive regarding the effectiveness of attractors as 44–89% felt that attractors improved fishing. 

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(P40) Assessment of Thermal Discharge on Reservoir Fish Community on Turtle Creek Reservoir in Sullivan County, Indiana
AUTHORS. Cole P. Baird, Ball State University; Kevin A. Gaston, Paul D. McMurray, Jr., James R. Stahl – Indiana Department of Environmental Management

ABSTRACT. In 2018, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management conducted a fish community assessment of Turtle Creek Reservoir, Sullivan County, Indiana to determine the impact of a permitted thermal discharge from a nearby coal-fired electrical generating station on the reservoir’s fish population.  Six randomly selected 500 meter near-shore transects were sampled by night-time electrofishing, including just downstream of the discharge point to the reservoir, refugia, and near the dam at the opposite end of the reservoir. The collected data are being used to help further the understanding of the response of these biotic communities to thermal discharges, and to determine if “No Harm” has occurred to the Balanced Indigenous Community due to anthropogenic input of thermal loads.   

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(P42) Comparison of Three Age-estimation Methods Using Scales and Otoliths for Bloater (Coregonus hoyi) in Lake Michigan
AUTHORS. Kristy Phillips, Timothy O'Brien, Steve Farha – USGS Great Lakes Science Center

ABSTRACT. Bloater (Coregonus hoyi) are valuable as both a commercial species and endemic prey fish in the upper Great Lakes. Reliable age estimates are critical to population models and sound management of bloater stocks. A reference set of 128 bloater were used to compare scale and sagittal otolith methods with the goals to compare age estimates between structures and to increase precision in age estimates within and among readers. Scales were pressed onto acetate slides and read using a microfiche projector, while sagittal otoliths were thin-sectioned using precision saws. Otolith ages were estimated using microscopy and static, 2D images. There was good agreement between microscopy and static 2D image estimates between and among readers and high variability in the average coefficient of variation (ACV) between and among readers with scale reads. In general, scale ages were estimated to be lower overall when compared to the microscope and image estimates across all readers. Otolith microscope reads using transmitted light had the highest percent agreement among the three readers (65.4%, 54.3%, and 61.4%, 3 reads each). The otolith structure had a lower ACV (range = 4.3 – 7.6%) among the three readers when compared to scales (range = 7.4 – 12.1%). When comparing otolith microscope and 2D image estimates, results varied per reader, however ACV remained under the recommended 10% CV for each reader regardless of otolith structure aging method. These results may be influenced by reader experience, but this study has demonstrated that sagittal otoliths are superior to scales for estimating age of Lake Michigan bloater. To achieve higher precision and agreement within and among readers it is recommended that sagittal otoliths be used to estimate bloater ages.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(P43) Effectiveness of Zote Soap Baited Trotlines in Assessing Channel Catfish and Aquatic Turtle Bycatch
AUTHORS. Ryen Kemp, Coty Prunest, Colton McKivitz, Hae Kim, Quinton Phelps – West Virginia University

ABSTRACT. Biologists commonly use Zote<sup>TM </sup>soap as bait in tandem hoop-nets to effectively sample for channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Previous studies suggest that Zote<sup>TM </sup>soap is effective in reducing aquatic turtle-bycatch. This is crucial due to the high mortality rate of aquatic turtles as bycatch for both hoop nets and trotlines. However, there are very few studies that have been done to evaluate aquatic turtle bycatch on Zote<sup>TM </sup>soap baited trotlines. Additionally, no studies have evaluated the effectiveness of different colors of Zote<sup>TM </sup>soap to assess catch rates of both channel catfish and aquatic turtle bycatch. Our trotlines will be set overnight, soaking for twenty-four hours, on the Monongahela River. Each line will consist of twenty-five 2/0 sized hooks. Each hook will be baited with a piece of Zote<sup>TM</sup> soap that is approximately the size of a nickel. To eliminate a bias in color, each hook will be randomly assigned a specific Zote<sup>TM </sup>soap color, which will consist of either: pink, white, or blue. Preliminary data suggest that pink Zote<sup>TM </sup>Soap is more efficient and effective than white or blue Zote<sup>TM</sup> soap. Our sampling sites will be determined by randomly selecting areas with large scale river features or macrohabitats (i.e., main channel, inlet, and backwaters) in the Monongahela River. During our study we seek out to determine if sampling with Zote<sup>TM </sup>soap baited trotlines will effectively sample channel catfish populations while also reducing aquatic turtle bycatch and evaluate the catch rates of multiple colors of Zote<sup>TM </sup>soap.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques

6:00pm EST

(P46) Precision of Age Estimates Obtained from Sectioned and Whole Bluegill Otoliths
AUTHORS. Jeff Koch, Ben Neely, Connor Chance-Ossowski – Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism

ABSTRACT. We estimated age of 257 Bluegills collected from Kansas impoundments using whole and sectioned otoliths.  Three readers independently aged each structure and age estimates were compared to evaluate bias between readers and structures.  In general, agreement between readers was high for both whole and sectioned otoliths.  Between-reader agreement was greater than 92% for all reader comparisons for both preparation techniques and mean coefficient of variation (CV) values were less than 5% for all between reader comparisons.  Exact agreement of whole and sectioned otoliths was 82.8% to 85.2%, depending on reader.  When comparing whole and sectioned otolith ages, significant deviation from the 1:1 line of equivalency on age bias plots was only present for one reader and age combination, which was age 0 and was likely due to inconsistencies in identification of the first annulus.  In general, both preparation techniques for bluegill otoliths yielded precise age estimates.  No trends in between-reader or between-structure bias were evident with increasing purported age.  Due to the additional time and cost of mounting and sectioning Bluegill otoliths, we recommend using whole otoliths to estimate bluegill age up to age 8.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST
SUPERIOR BALLROOM C/D
  Poster, Fisheries Techniques
 
Wednesday, January 30
 

10:20am EST

(FISHERIES: TECHNIQUES) Using Measures of Precision and Catch to Estimate Sample Size Required to Meet Sampling Objectives for Standard Sport Fish Assessments
AUTHORS: Stephen M. Tyszko, Jeremy J. Pritt, Joseph D. Conroy –Ohio Division of Wildlife

ABSTRACT: Using standard sampling methods for sport fish assessment allows powerful comparisons across time and space, if sample size is adequate. Biologists have begun evaluating precision and catch of sport fish surveys using North American standard methods (NASM) and have used resample methods to estimates sample sizes required to meet precision and catch objectives. The Ohio Division of Wildlife has collected standard sport fish surveys since 2003, providing an opportunity to further understand the performance of these methods. We evaluated relative standard error (RSE) and catch of stock-length individuals for NASM Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides electrofishing surveys  and NASM crappie (Pomoxis spp.) fyke net surveys in Ohio reservoirs 2003–2017.  We then used resampling methods to estimates sample sizes required to meet two sampling objectives: (1) for CPUE, achieve an RSE = 25; and, (2) collect at least 100 stock-length fish. We found that Largemouth Bass and crappie surveys generally met sampling objectives.  Resample analysis showed that the median number of samples required to meet objectives for Largemouth Bass surveys was 12 or fewer and the median for crappie surveys was 20 or fewer.  Our results support literature that shows NASM electrofishing can be used to obtain precise Largemouth Bass samples that meet catch objectives with a reasonable sample size.  Our crappie survey results contrasted literature that shows NASM fyke net methods required prohibitively large sample sizes to meet precision and catch objectives.  This analysis advances our understanding of sample size requirements for standard methods and highlights the importance of estimating sample size when designing standard surveys. Furthermore, we propose a standard resampling method for estimating sample size requirements.    

Wednesday January 30, 2019 10:20am - 10:40am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM A

10:20am EST

(HUMAN DIMENSIONS: FISHERIES 2) Review of Fishing Pressure and Harvest on Southern Indiana Waterbodies 1983-2017
AUTHORS: Sandy Clark-Kolaks, Indiana Department of Natural Resources

ABSTRACT: Creel surveys provide estimates of angler effort, catch rate, and angler preference that can assist biologists in better managing fish populations. Indiana Department of Natural Resources (INDNR) has been conducting creel surveys since the 1960s on selected waterbodies using either two-stage cluster non-uniform probability or roving access designs. Creels typically ran from early spring through late fall and expansion factors were applied to the daily observations totals for each observed category to provide projections of monthly lake-wide fishing pressure and harvest. Information collected during creels is used for individual waterbody evaluations but no landscape level review of creels has been conducted. From 1983 to 2017, over 50 waterbodies have had creel surveys conducted, ranging in size from 1 to 10,750 acres. Creel survey frequencies were highly variable ranging from 16 to 1 times. The majority of anglers were targeting Largemouth Bass; however, in urban areas anglers tended to be less species specific and were most likely fishing for anything. Larger reservoirs had the greatest number of angler trips, number of fish harvested, and fishing hours. However, when normalizing metrics by lake size; smaller urban lakes had the greatest trips per acre, fish harvested per acre, fishing hours per acre, and economic impact. A major focus of the INDNR is recruiting and retaining new anglers. Urban areas contain the largest group of potential angler recruits; however, counties with the greatest population densities had very low public water available to anglers and in seven counties no public waterbodies are available to anglers. This landscape level evaluation of creel surveys provides direction to managers about where efforts should be made to increase the availability of public waters to recruit and maintain new anglers.

Wednesday January 30, 2019 10:20am - 10:40am EST
VETERANS MEETING ROOM C/D

10:40am EST

(FISHERIES: TECHNIQUES) Use of Lake Michigan and Indiana Standard Trap Nets to Collect Crappie: A Comparison of Catch, Size Structure, and Cost Effectiveness
AUTHORS: Andrew Bueltmann, Sandra Clark-Kolaks – Indiana Department of Natural Resources

ABSTRACT: Two entrapment gears, the Indiana Standard trap net (INS) and the Small Lake Michigan trap net (LM), were compared to evaluate which was more efficient and more cost effective for collecting Crappie. Gears were deployed randomly at four total lakes, one in 2017 and three in 2018. Efficiency was measured by effort needed to collect a similar sample size between gears along with time required to run both nets. Further, cost effectiveness was measured by the individual cost of both nets and the number of cheap nets which could be purchased for the more expensive net. Specifically, a single LM costs ~$4,500 and a single INS costs ~$500; therefore, nine INS could be purchased for one LM. Cost effectiveness was then calculated as the ratio of estimated catch:estimated labor time to run the necessary number of nets so that individual costs were equivalent (i.e., one LM to nine INS). The larger the ratio, the more cost effective the gear type. All lake data were pooled for analysis and indicate that size distribution between nets does not differ and mean overnight catch rates were nearly triple the amount higher for LM (14.8) than INS (5.6). Further, labor time required to achieve equivalent catch rates were as follows: one LM net (~9.8 to 60.4 mins to run) to three INS nets (~10.5 to 58.8 mins to run). Although mean overnight catch rate was higher for LM, cost effectiveness indicates little to no difference between the gears with INS (0.7) being slightly more cost effective than LM (0.5).

Wednesday January 30, 2019 10:40am - 11:00am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM A

11:00am EST

(FISHERIES: TECHNIQUES) Evaluation of Gill Net Design to Sample Fishes in Kansas Impoundments: Year Two
AUTHORS: Nick Kramer, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism

ABSTRACT: Gill nets are one of the most popular gears implemented to assess fish populations in North America. Ease of construction and low maintenance has led to their success and widespread implementation in the field of fisheries management. The characteristics of a gill net, along with the size and shape of the fish affect how capture occurs (i.e., wedging, gilling, tangling, or a combination). Many studies have been completed on selectivity of various sizes of mesh. Despite the importance of mesh size, the shape of the mesh can also be altered by modifying the hanging ratio which in turn will affect the catchability of fishes with differing body shapes. Additional studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of hobbling or tying down gill nets. This creates more of a “baggy” net which studies have shown to capture a wider size range of fish and may increase catches of species that could easily become tangled due to external protrusions (e.g., Channel Catfish or Paddlefish). In recent years, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism biologists have become interested in managing Blue and Flathead Catfish and have placed an increased priority on sampling these species; however, the biologists currently have little insight into fully representative population parameters due to standardized sampling gear that does not capture larger individuals. Thus, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of various gill net designs to sample fish populations in Kansas impoundments with special consideration given to species of interest for biologists (e.g., Blue Catfish, Flathead Catfish). Year one of this study found differences in catch rates for some commonly assessed species. These differences were further examined in year two of the study by expanding the sample size; in both number of sets and number of reservoirs.

Wednesday January 30, 2019 11:00am - 11:20am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM A

11:20am EST

(FISHERIES: TECHNIQUES) Comparison of Hydroacoustic Survey Designs for Coldwater Forage Assessment in a Missouri River Reservoir
AUTHORS: Nicholas B. Kludt, South Dakota State University; Mark J. Fincel, South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks; Brian D.S. Graeb, South Dakota State University

ABSTRACT: Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax and Cisco Coregonus artedi are the primary coldwater forage species in Lake Oahe, South Dakota. Understanding the dynamics of these species is an important aspect of Walleye Sander vitreus and Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha management. As these coldwater species are pelagic and heterogeneously distributed throughout the stratified reservoir zone, they have been historically surveyed using hydroacoustics. Hydroacoustics offers the ability to efficiently survey large areas, but can be time consuming. We compared the traditional cross-sectional transects (2.5 ± 0.8 km) with an abbreviated longitudinal transect (0.5 ± 0.0 km) survey, using a paired design replicated over three months and two years (n=97). We then analyzed the observed target densities of Rainbow Smelt and Lake Herring using a mean square error (MSE) approach. Observed densities were highly correlated for both Rainbow Smelt (r = 0.91) and Cisco (r = 0.94). Decomposing MSE revealed random error components of 67.3% and 99.7% of Rainbow Smelt and Cisco, respectively, indicating no systemic differences between the paired estimates. In either case, estimates were statistically comparable to a 1:1 line with a zero intercept, indicating high observational agreement. These results show no discernible difference between survey designs. While travel time between sites remains constant, the difference between longitudinal (6 min) and cross sectional (30 min) transect scanning times equates to an 80% time savings (1 hr, 42 mins vs. 8 hr, 38 mins). We therefore recommend the adoption of the longitudinal design for future standardized sampling of Lake Oahe coldwater stocks.

Wednesday January 30, 2019 11:20am - 11:40am EST
CENTER STREET ROOM A

11:20am EST

(HUMAN DIMENSIONS: FISHERIES 2) Successes and Limitations of a Roving-access Angler Survey Design to Increase Numbers and Frequency of Reservoirs Surveyed in Ohio
AUTHORS: Kevin S. Page, Ohio Division of Wildlife

ABSTRACT: Reservoirs in Ohio are surveyed annually by the Ohio Division of Wildlife (ODOW) to collect fishery-relevant information on angler effort, catch, and harvest. Historically, the ODOW conducted roving-access site angler creel surveys on weekdays and weekends during the months of April–September. However, the costs associated with conducting these intensive surveys limited the number of locations surveyed annually (0–5). In 2004, a new angler survey design was implemented that only targeted periods of greatest overall and directed angler effort (May–July, weekends), thereby decreasing the number of surveys at any one reservoir but increasing the number of reservoirs surveyed. This design has been instrumental in increasing the spatial and temporal extent of angler surveys. As of 2016, more than 300 angler surveys have been conducted at more than 100 reservoirs. To validate that the “targeted” survey design continues to provide useful fishery metrics, intensive angler surveys (March–November, weekdays and weekends) were conducted at four reservoirs during 2017. This full extensive dataset was compared to a subset representing the typical high-use survey. Overall, the “targeted” strategy continues to effectively monitor overall angler effort and catch, but may miss the peak periods (spring and fall) for certain fisheries.

Wednesday January 30, 2019 11:20am - 11:40am EST
VETERANS MEETING ROOM C/D