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Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! Please note, this event has passed. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

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CONFERENCE SCHEDULE UPDATES & CHANGES: As a result of the prolonged government shutdown, we experienced a number of cancellations and changes to the schedule. Cancellations and changes are listed here (as of January 26, 2019). 

Wednesday, January 30 • 10:40am - 11:00am
(CANCELLED) (SYMPOSIA-14) Wetlands as Common Ground for Fish and Wildlife: Identifying Challenges and Opportunities

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AUTHORS: Elisabeth B. Webb, U.S. Geological Survey, Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

ABSTRACT: Wetlands are one of the few ecosystems that provide habitat for both fish and wildlife; therefore, wetland ecosystems are unique in both their ecological communities and the management practices used to promote these communities. As wetlands are biologically and hydrologically diverse, they are highly productive ecosystems, which can meet the life-history needs for a wide a variety of avian, amphibian, mammal and fish species. However, due to the ephemeral nature of wetland habitats and substantial rates of wetland loss across North America, incorporating wetland management practices that provide habitats for and meet the life-history needs of the entire suite of wetland dependent taxa remains a challenge. Here, I will discuss a range of wetland management practices, such as water-level manipulation, prescribed burning and mowing, used to promote specific species or taxa, and the subsequent impacts experienced by other wetland-dependent species. In particular, the phenology of these wetland management practices and hydrogeomorphology of the wetlands in which they are applied, are important considerations in managing wetlands for both fish and wildlife. I will also cover monitoring techniques that can be used to concurrently sample wetlands for both fish and wildlife. Information on fish and wildlife species presence within a wetland is important to not only evaluate the effectiveness of management practices, but to further identify opportunities for future multi-taxa wetland management.

Wednesday January 30, 2019 10:40am - 11:00am
HOPE BALLROOM A

Attendees (10)