Loading…
Attending this event?
Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! The schedule is subject to change (as of November 20, 2018). Please check back for updates. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

TIPS FOR NAVIGATING THIS SCHEDULE:
The conference schedule is hosted in SCHED which allows you to search within the schedule, and filter the schedule to show items only occurring on a certain date or within a track/symposia.
  • To view only a certain type of presentation or track, locate the heading "Filter By Type" in the navigation bar. As an example, try clicking on "T01: Fisheries: Great Lakes I".
  • The default view for the schedule is "Simple" which only shows the start time and title of the agenda item. Hover over the button that says "Schedule" to see the different view options. The "Expanded" option will show start and end times, room location, and session description, if there is one.
  • You can build your own schedule by creating a free account with SCHED by selecting "SIGN UP." Watch the "how-to" video to learn more about using Sched. 
  • PLEASE NOTE: Adding agenda items to your schedule through this app does not sign you up for a session. If an agenda item says "pre-registration required" or charges an additional fee, you need to add the item to your registration through the online registration system

View analytic
Tuesday, January 29 • 3:40pm - 4:00pm
(FISHERIES: BIG RIVERS) Age-0 Daily Growth Estimation of Commercially Exploited Channel Catfish in a Free-Flowing Midwestern River

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

AUTHORS: K.B. Wood, Cassi J. Moody-Carpenter, Robert E. Colombo – Eastern Illinois University

ABSTRACT: Highly variable discharge experienced by the lower Wabash River due to a more natural hydrology pattern overlaps with Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) reproduction period; this leads to variable conditions for age-0 fish to develop upon hatching. There ubiquitous pattern of cryptic information published about age-0 Channel Catfish, and any insight would be advantageous to multiple facets in Channel Catfish life history. While a male will spawn multiple times through the year, reproduction is dictated by the females, only becoming gravid once annually; females becoming gravid at separate times leads to there being non-coeval cohorts. In their larval stages, endogenous feeding promotes a constant growth rate, but switching to exogenous feeding and entering the juvenile stages leads to growth dependent on the environmental conditions. We observed stable reproduction in varying conditions over four years of sampling (p > .05). Peak abundance in August signifies a peak in the aggregation of cohorts. Past surveys have shown there are at least five cohorts of age-0 Channel Catfish throughout the spawning season in the Wabash River; investigations into growth patterns of these cohorts by estimating daily growth from the otoliths can offer insight into which cohorts may best be utilizing their available resources. Variations in growth patterns could come from present conditions, normal seasonal variation, or a combination of both. Results from this study could aid in creating a recruitment index for Channel Catfish in this exploited lotic system. 

Tuesday January 29, 2019 3:40pm - 4:00pm
CENTER STREET ROOM D

Attendees (1)