Loading…
Attending this event?
Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! The schedule is subject to change (as of November 20, 2018). Please check back for updates. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

TIPS FOR NAVIGATING THIS SCHEDULE:
The conference schedule is hosted in SCHED which allows you to search within the schedule, and filter the schedule to show items only occurring on a certain date or within a track/symposia.
  • To view only a certain type of presentation or track, locate the heading "Filter By Type" in the navigation bar. As an example, try clicking on "T01: Fisheries: Great Lakes I".
  • The default view for the schedule is "Simple" which only shows the start time and title of the agenda item. Hover over the button that says "Schedule" to see the different view options. The "Expanded" option will show start and end times, room location, and session description, if there is one.
  • You can build your own schedule by creating a free account with SCHED by selecting "SIGN UP." Watch the "how-to" video to learn more about using Sched. 
  • PLEASE NOTE: Adding agenda items to your schedule through this app does not sign you up for a session. If an agenda item says "pre-registration required" or charges an additional fee, you need to add the item to your registration through the online registration system

View analytic
Tuesday, January 29 • 2:20pm - 2:40pm
(FISHERIES: EARLY LIFE HISTORY) Phenology and Magnitude of Larval Fish Drift and Production Near the St. Marys River Rapids, MI

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

AUTHORS: Jason Gostiaux, Contractor at US Geological Survey; Edward F. Roseman, US Geological Survey; Robin L. DeBruyne, University of Toledo; Jason L. Fischer, University of Toledo; Ashley Moerke, Lake Superior State University; Kevin Kapuscinski, Lake Superior State University; Christopher Olds, US Fish & Wildlife Service; Faith Vandrunen, Contractor at US Geological Survey; Kaley Genther, US Fish and Wildlife Service; Ethan Binkowski, Lake Superior State University

ABSTRACT: The St. Marys River is the Great Lakes connecting channel connecting Lake Superior to Lake Huron and is the international border between Michigan, United States, and Ontario, Canada.  This large river has a variety of habitats present including lakes, wetlands, islands, tributaries, side channels, and main channels.  Water flow is regulated through the navigational locks and a series of 16 compensating gates immediately upstream of the area known as the St. Marys Rapids.  This area is considered an important spawning and nursery area for numerous fish species, although no research has been done to assess fish use or production.  To address this knowledge gap, active and passive larval sampling gears were used to measure the timing and abundance of larval fishes upstream and downstream of the St. Marys Rapids area from May-August 2018.  Drifting eggs and larvae were collected near the bottom and surface during weekly daytime and nighttime sampling.  Eggs and larvae of several native (suckers, sculpins, troutperch, minnows) and introduced species (rainbow smelt, salmonids) were collected at sites above and below the St. Marys Rapids area, however, larval fish and eggs were more abundant below the St. Marys Rapids.  Furthermore, salmonid and lake sturgeon larvae were only captured downstream of the rapids area.  Lake sturgeon larvae have been documented in the Garden River, Ontario, a tributary of the St. Marys River, however, this is the first contemporary documentation of successful lake sturgeon spawning and larval drift within the St. Marys River proper.  Evidence of fish use of the St. Marys Rapids including the presence of multiple sensitive species, confirms the importance of this area for spawning, production, and biodiversity.

Tuesday January 29, 2019 2:20pm - 2:40pm
CENTER STREET ROOM D