Loading…
Attending this event?
Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! The schedule is subject to change (as of November 7, 2018). Please check back for updates. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

TIPS FOR NAVIGATING THIS SCHEDULE:
The conference schedule is hosted in SCHED which allows you to search within the schedule, and filter the schedule to show items only occurring on a certain date or within a track/symposia.
  • To view only a certain type of presentation or track, locate the heading "Filter By Type" in the navigation bar. As an example, try clicking on "T01: Fisheries: Great Lakes I".
  • The default view for the schedule is "Simple" which only shows the start time and title of the agenda item. Hover over the button that says "Schedule" to see the different view options. The "Expanded" option will show start and end times, room location, and session description, if there is one.
  • You can build your own schedule by creating a free account with SCHED by selecting "SIGN UP." Watch the "how-to" video to learn more about using Sched. 
  • PLEASE NOTE: Adding agenda items to your schedule through this app does not sign you up for a session. If an agenda item says "pre-registration required" or charges an additional fee, you need to add the item to your registration through the online registration system

View analytic
Monday, January 28 • 3:20pm - 3:40pm
(WILDLIFE: CERVIDS) Causes of Mortality in Minnesota’s Declining Moose Population

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

AUTHORS: Michelle Carstensen, Erik C. Hildebrand, Dawn Plattner, Margaret Dexter – Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Arno Wünschmann, Anibal Armien – University of Minnesota-Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

ABSTRACT: Minnesota’s moose (Alces alces) are dying at rates much higher than elsewhere in North America. Moose have been nearly extirpated from the northwestern part of the state and aerial surveys indicate the northeastern population has declined 55% over the past decade. In 2013, a new study began to determine cause-specific mortality of adult moose in northeastern Minnesota by using GPS-satellite collars to get rapid notification of mortality events and recover carcasses within 24 hours of death. A total of 173 moose were collared over 3 years with annual non-hunting mortality rates of 19%, 12%, 15%, 13% and 14% in 2013-2017, respectively, and an overall mean of 14.4%. In total, 57 moose have died from non-hunting sources of mortality and 3 moose were legally harvested. Response times from mortality notification to arrival at the carcass were within 24 hours for 65% of death events. Most causes of mortality were health-related (65%), which included parasites (30%; e.g., winter ticks, brainworm, and liver flukes), bacterial infections (20%), accidents (3%), calving (2%) and other undetermined health issues (10%).The remainder was wolf-related (30%), with predisposing health conditions identified in nearly half of these moose.  Legal harvest accounted for 5% of moose deaths. During the same time period, we also necropsied anecdotal moose deaths (n=91) across northern Minnesota, which included vehicle or train collisions, sick, and found dead animals. Parelaphostrongylus tenuis was confirmed in 42% of these cases, which is nearly twice the rate of detection of this parasite as in the collared moose studied during the same time period. 

Monday January 28, 2019 3:20pm - 3:40pm
CENTER STREET ROOM D

Attendees (1)