Loading…
Attending this event?
Welcome to the interactive web schedule for the 2019 Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference! The schedule is subject to change (as of November 7, 2018). Please check back for updates. To return to the main Conference website, go to: www.midwestfw.org.

TIPS FOR NAVIGATING THIS SCHEDULE:
The conference schedule is hosted in SCHED which allows you to search within the schedule, and filter the schedule to show items only occurring on a certain date or within a track/symposia.
  • To view only a certain type of presentation or track, locate the heading "Filter By Type" in the navigation bar. As an example, try clicking on "T01: Fisheries: Great Lakes I".
  • The default view for the schedule is "Simple" which only shows the start time and title of the agenda item. Hover over the button that says "Schedule" to see the different view options. The "Expanded" option will show start and end times, room location, and session description, if there is one.
  • You can build your own schedule by creating a free account with SCHED by selecting "SIGN UP." Watch the "how-to" video to learn more about using Sched. 
  • PLEASE NOTE: Adding agenda items to your schedule through this app does not sign you up for a session. If an agenda item says "pre-registration required" or charges an additional fee, you need to add the item to your registration through the online registration system

View analytic
Monday, January 28 • 3:20pm - 3:40pm
(SYMPOSIA-02) Case Study: Using a Drone Mounted Thermal Camera to Detect Eastern Massasaugas at Jennings Environmental Education Center, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

AUTHORS: Christine Proctor, Albert Sarvis – Harrisburg University of Science and Technology

ABSTRACT: Once a widespread and common snake, the eastern massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus catenatus) is protected in every state where it currently occurs and is listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. The use of drones to count wildlife is increasing, however they are primarily used to quantify conspicuous endothermic species. This ongoing study is exploring the potential of drone mounted thermal imaging to increase detection of this cryptic reptile. We hypothesized that thermal imaging captured via a remotely controlled drone will increase our ability to accurately quantify eastern massasauga populations, as compared to more traditional methods. A thermal sensor mounted to a drone was manually flown over a 20-acre managed prairie with a confirmed population of eastern massasaugas in a systematic pattern at an elevation of 10 meters, providing a ground resolution of 1.85 centimeters. Two controllers were used, allowing one person to focus on flying the drone while the other closely monitored the imagery. A third person was directed to the location of a suspected snake for visual confirmation. Once visual confirmation was made, we collected temperature data for both the snake and the ambient environment using a laser thermometer. This allowed for an increased understanding of the minimal temperature difference between the snake and ground required for detection, helping to set target temperature ranges and improve overall detection. During this process we also collected data on thermal signatures of non-snake items such as small mammals, branches, ant hills, and water, helping to train observers on how to interpret the imagery at a higher accuracy. The results from this study have the potential to improve the accuracy of data collection, influencing the future of cryptic reptile detection.

Monday January 28, 2019 3:20pm - 3:40pm
HOPE BALLROOM B

Attendees (2)